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Maximizing Utilization in Pancreas Transplantation

Phenotypic Characteristics Differentiating Aggressive From Nonaggressive Transplant Centers

Serrano, Oscar Kenneth, MD1; Vock, David M., PhD2; Dunn, Ty B., MD1; Kandaswamy, Raja, MBBS1; Finger, Erik B., MD, PhD1

doi: 10.1097/TP.0000000000002334
Original Clinical Science—General

Background Maximizing pancreas utilization requires a balance between judicious donor selection and transplant center aggressiveness. We sought to determine how such aggressiveness affects transplant outcomes.

Methods Using the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, we studied 28 487 deceased-donor adult pancreas transplants. Donor and recipient demographic factors indicative of aggressiveness were used to score center aggressiveness. We compared outcomes of low (> 1 SD below mean), medium (± 1 SD from mean), and high (> 1 SD above mean) aggressiveness centers using bivariate and multivariable regressions.

Results Donor and recipient aggressiveness demonstrated a roughly linear relationship (R 2 = 0.20). Center volume correlated moderately with donor (r s = 0.433) and recipient (r s = 0.270) aggressiveness. In bivariate analysis, there was little impact of donor selection aggressiveness on graft survival. Further, for simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplants, centers with greater recipient aggressiveness selection had better graft survival. High-volume centers had better graft survival than low-volume centers. In multivariable analysis, donor aggressiveness did not have an effect on graft survival, whereas graft survival for medium (hazard ratio [HR], 0.66, 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.53-0.83) and high (HR, 0.67; CI, 0.51-0.86) recipient aggressiveness performed better than low-aggressiveness centers. There was a clear volume effect, with high-volume centers (>20 transplants/year; HR, 0.69; CI, 0.61-0.79) performing better than low-volume centers.

Conclusions Center practice patterns using higher-risk donors and recipients did not negatively affect outcomes. This effect is likely mediated through efficiencies gained with the increased transplant volumes at these centers.

Aggressiveness center practice patterns using higher risk pancreas donors and recipients does not negatively affect outcomes, and this effect is likely mediated through efficiencies gained with the increased transplant volumes at these centers.

1 Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

2 Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

Received 26 February 2018. Revision received 23 May 2018.

Accepted 12 June 2018.

The data reported here were supplied by the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation as the contractor for the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR). The interpretation and reporting of these data are the responsibility of the authors and in no way should be seen as representing the official policy or view of either the SRTR or the U.S. government.

The authors declare no funding or conflicts of interest.

Presented at the 16th International Congress of the International Pancreas and Islet Transplant Association (Oxford, United Kingdom), June 21-24, 2017.

O.K.S., D.M.V., and E.B.F. participated in research design. O.K.S. and E.B.F. participated in the writing of the article. O.K.S., D.M.V., T.B.D., R.K., and E.B.F. participated in the editing of the article. O.K.S., D.M.V., T.B.D., R.K., and E.B.F. participated in the performance of the research. D.M.V. and E.B.F. contributed new reagents or analytic tools. O.K.S., D.M.V., and E.B.F. participated in data analysis.

Correspondence: Oscar Kenneth Serrano, MD, Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Mayo Mail Code 195, 420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455. (serra061@umn.edu).

Supplemental digital content (SDC) is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text, and links to the digital files are provided in the HTML text of this article on the journal’s Web site (www.transplantjournal.com).

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