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Looking Beyond Test Results

Interprofessional Collaborative Management of Persistent Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms

Mashima, Pauline; Waldron-Perrine, Brigid; Seagly, Katharine; Milman, Lisa; Ashman, Teresa; Mudar, Raksha; Paul, Diane

doi: 10.1097/TLD.0000000000000189
Original Articles
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Patients with cognitive concerns following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), often referred to as concussion, present with complex constellations of strengths and limitations. Increasing evidence indicates that psychosocial factors, as opposed to the injury itself, predict persistent symptoms. As an alternative to the traditional medical model, a person-centered model empowers the patient to move forward past the injury in order to optimize function and maximize quality of life. Patient-centered assessment and treatment by speech–language pathologists, neuropsychologists, and rehabilitation psychologists can engender change, reduce perceived limitations, and increase participation in meaningful activities and roles. This article outlines several collaborative, process-oriented approaches to managing cognitive concerns subsequent to mTBI. The emphasis is on maximizing patient participation to guide clinical decision making and build self-efficacy. The authors are members of the Joint Committee on Interprofessional Relations Between the American Psychological Association (APA) and the American Speech–Language–Hearing Association (ASHA).

Department of Communi-cation Sciences & Disorders, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Honolulu (Dr Mashima); Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Neuropsychology, Detroit Medical Center/Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan (Dr Waldron-Perrine); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (Dr Waldron-Perrine); Division of Rehabilitation Psychology and Neuropsychology, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan/Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor (Dr Seagly); Language & Aphasia NeuroRehabili-tation Lab, Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, Logan (Dr Milman); Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Dr Mudar); and American Speech–Language–Hearing Association, Rockville, Maryland (Dr Paul). Dr Ashman is a private practitioner, New York, New York.

Corresponding Author: Pauline Mashima, PhD, CCC, F-SLP, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, University of Hawaii, 677 Ala Moana Blvd, Ste 625, Honolulu, HI 96813 (mashima@hawaii.edu).

All authors are members of the Joint Committee on Interprofessional Relations Between the American Psychological Association (APA) and the American Speech–Language–Hearing Association (ASHA).

The authors have indicated that they have no financial and no nonfinancial relationships to disclose.

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