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Comparison of Functional Outcomes Between Elderly and Young Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury in a Subacute Rehabilitation Unit

Kim, Doo Young, MD; Kim, Min-Hyun, MD; Pyun, Sung-Bom, MD, PhD

Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation: April/June 2019 - Volume 35 - Issue 2 - p 141–148
doi: 10.1097/TGR.0000000000000224
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Objectives: To compare the clinical characteristics and outcomes between elderly and young patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a subacute rehabilitation unit.

Subjects and Methods: Ninety-two TBI patients who had been admitted to a rehabilitation unit from January 2010 to July 2017 were included for analysis and categorized into elderly and young TBI patient groups. A retrospective analysis was performed to compare the clinical characteristics and functional outcomes of the 2 groups at admission and discharge. The main measures included the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Modified Barthel Index (MBI), and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS).

Results: The most common cause of injury was fall, and subdural hematoma was more common in the elderly group. Although initial GCS scores were similar between both groups, BBS and MBI scores at admission were significantly lower in elderly patients. At discharge, the MMSE, BBS, and MBI scores were significantly better in the young TBI group. However, the amount of functional improvement (Δ) in MMSE, BBS, and MBI scores during admission and the home discharge rate were similar in both groups (P > .05).

Conclusion: Although the initial injury severity was similar in both groups, the functional outcome of cognition, balance, and activities of daily living at discharge was better in the young TBI group. However, the amount of functional improvement was similar after rehabilitation, regardless of age.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, International St Mary's Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University, Incheon, Korea (Dr Kim); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (Drs Kim and Pyun); and Brain Convergence Research Center, Korea University, Seoul, Korea (Dr Pyun).

Correspondence: Sung-Bom Pyun, MD, PhD, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Korea University College of Medicine, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea (rmpyun@korea.ac.kr).

This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIT) (No. 2019R1A2C2003020).

The authors have no other financial conflicts of interest.

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