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Resilience and Volunteering: A Critical Step to Maintaining Function Among Older Adults With Depressive Symptoms and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Klinedinst, N. Jennifer PhD, MPH, RN; Resnick, Barbara PhD, RN, CRNP, FAAN, FAANP

doi: 10.1097/TGR.0000000000000023
Resilience
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Older adults with depressive symptoms and mild cognitive impairment are at high risk for functional decline. Building resilience and promoting physical activity are important ways to promote function. Engaging in volunteer activities builds resilience, promotes physical activity, reduces depressive symptoms, and slows functional decline. However, most volunteer programs are designed for high-functioning, community-dwelling older adults. Thus, those at the highest risk for functional decline do not reap the benefits of volunteering. The Volunteering-in-Place program is described as a way to build resilience and maintain function among older adults at high risk for functional decline.

University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore.

Correspondence: N. Jennifer Klinedinst, PhD, MPH, RN, University of Maryland School of Nursing, 655 W Lombard St, Rm 404J, Baltimore, MD 21201 (klinedinst@son.umaryland.edu).

This work was supported by the National Hartford Centers of Geriatric Nursing Excellence Claire M. Fagin Fellowship program sponsored by the John A. Hartford Foundation. Dr Klinedinst is a National Hartford Centers of Geriatric Nursing Excellence Claire M. Fagin Fellow and assistant professor at University of Maryland School of Nursing. Dr Resnick is a professor at University of Maryland School of Nursing and coeditor of Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation.

The authors have disclosed that they have no significant relationships with, or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.

© 2014Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins