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Cooking Confidence and Healthy Eating Choices of Preadolescent Participants at a Cooking Camp

Dixon, Elizabeth J. MS; Condrasky, Margaret D. EdD; Sharp, Julia L. PhD; Corr, Anne Quinn BA

doi: 10.1097/TIN.0b013e31826f8de1
Clinical Practice and Community Projects

Children participating in cooking classes gain confidence in their abilities to prepare food, which may transfer into healthier eating habits. At the Cook Like a Chef camp for youth, the social cognitive theory supports increased cooking confidence as documented in areas of preparing healthy snacks, using healthy cooking techniques, eating healthy foods, and having a positive attitude toward food (P < .0001). Increased confidence was also seen in sautéing (P = .0026), stir-frying (P = .0015), limiting fat (P < .0001), limiting sugar (P < .0001), and eating more fiber (P < .0001). Cooking camps can influence cooking confidence and help children make healthier food choices.

Department of Food, Nutrition, and Packaging Science, College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences, 216 Poole Agricultural Center (Ms Dixon and Dr Condrasky), and Department of Mathematical Sciences, College of Engineering and Science (Dr Sharp), Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina; and Department of Nutritional Sciences, College of Health and Human Development, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park (Ms Corr).

Correspondence: Margaret D. Condrasky, EdD, Department of Food, Nutrition, and Packaging Science, College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences, 216 Poole Agricultural Center, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (mcondra@clemson.edu).

The authors have disclosed that they have no significant relationships with, or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.

© 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.