Hypertriglyceridemia: A review of the evidence

Elevated triglycerides are independently associated with increased atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. Hypertriglyceridemia is often a polygenic condition that can be affected by numerous interventions. Primary care NPs are well positioned to appropriately evaluate and manage hypertriglyceridemia, improving overall health outcomes.

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Newest lipoglycopeptides for the management of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) are some of the most commonly encountered infections worldwide. Hospitalizations as a result of ABSSSIs are associated with high mortality. This article discusses the role of oritavancin and dalbavancin, the two newest lipoglycopeptides, in the context of the other available I.V. infusion standard therapy options.

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Type 2 diabetes management: A practice guide for NPs

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an endocrine and metabolic disorder that requires ongoing medical management. If T2DM is not adequately assessed and managed, a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and complications may occur. This article provides clinical guidance to NPs on the management of T2DM in primary care settings.

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Variable clinical presentations of babesiosis

Human babesiosis continues to spread in multiple regions of the US. It is transmitted by Ixodes species ticks, as are Lyme disease and anaplasmosis. Its variable clinical presentations, together with serologic detection limitations, require that a high index of clinical suspicion be present for prompt diagnosis. This article discusses case examples showing the wide range of symptoms and presentations that are possible with babesiosis.

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According to the CDC, RSV is the leading cause of hospitalization in children in the United States and accounts for X hospitalizations every year in children under age 5.
According to the CDC, RSV is the leading cause of hospitalization in children in the United States and accounts for X hospitalizations every year in children under age 5.
According to the CDC, RSV is the leading cause of hospitalization in children in the United States and accounts for X hospitalizations every year in children under age 5.
According to the CDC, RSV is the leading cause of hospitalization in children in the United States and accounts for X hospitalizations every year in children under age 5.
According to the CDC, RSV is the leading cause of hospitalization in children in the United States and accounts for X hospitalizations every year in children under age 5.
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