Best of 2017

Creator:   Tarun Kunwar
Updated:   6/4/2018
Contains:  12 items
Enjoy this collection of our best articles from 2017.

Understanding employment contracts: What to know before you sign

Dolan, Carolyn M.

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(11):44-49, November 16, 2017.

NPs are conscientious providers, but when it comes to their own careers, they may not be as careful to apply the same prevention strategies, monitoring, and hypervigilance that they use with their patients to avoid poor outcomes. This article identifies potential risks in employment contracts and offers suggestions for avoiding disputes.

HPV awareness and vaccination rates in college-aged male athletes

McCutcheon, Tonna; Schaar, Gina; Herline, Alan; More

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(11):27-34, November 16, 2017.

College-aged males are at high risk for human papillomavirus (HPV); however, vaccination rates remain low, suggesting minimal HPV knowledge. Therefore, an educational intervention was developed and implemented to determine if an increase in HPV knowledge, perceived HPV risk, intention and perceived self-efficacy to obtain the vaccine, and vaccination rates were observed.

Genetic counseling for hereditary cancer: A primer for NPs

McReynolds, Kate; Lewis, Sara

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(7):22-28, July 15th, 2017.

Many patients have concerns regarding their family's cancer history and may be appropriate for referral to genetic counseling. This article examines indications for referral for genetic counseling for hereditary cancer, the process of genetic counseling and testing, and ways for NPs to collaborate with genetics providers.

Identifying malnutrition: From acute care to discharge and beyond

Tyler, Renay D.; Guenter, Peggi

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(4):18-24, April 16th, 2017.

Nutrition assessment and intervention significantly contribute to the well-being of patients. NPs should advocate that patients be appropriately evaluated and implement recommendations as part of a comprehensive care plan to avoid malnutrition in patients while they are in the hospital and when they return home.

Drug updates and approvals: 2017 in review

Mospan, Geoffrey; Mospan, Cortney; Vance, Shayna; More

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):8-16, December 15, 2017.

In 2017, the FDA approved several new drugs for use in primary care. This article highlights the following new drugs: brodalumab (Siliq), dapagliflozin and saxagliptin (Qtern), dupilumab (Dupixent), oxymetazoline (Rhofade), safinamide (Xadago), and sarilumab (Kevzara).

The transition of care from hospital to home for patients with hypertension

Franklin, Mary M.; McCoy, Mary Anne

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(2):12-18, February 12th, 2017.

Approximately 50% to 75% of hospital patients have hypertension. This article describes the transition of care from the hospital to home for patients with hypertension and discusses practice implications for NPs.

An update on type 2 diabetes management in primary care

Waddell, Jeffrey

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(8):20-29, August 17, 2017.

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease impacting glucose metabolism. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) stems from the inability of the body to utilize endogenous insulin properly. Approximately 90% to 95% of newly diagnosed cases of diabetes are T2DM. This article focuses on the initial treatment of T2DM based on the 2017 American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Endocrinology clinical practice guidelines. The 2017 update includes changes and additions regarding psychosocial management, physical activity, surgery, and hypoglycemia.

Colorectal cancer screening: Using evidence-based guidelines

Mahon, Suzanne M.

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(10):18-26, October 18, 2017.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in men and women. There are multiple options for prevention and early detection. Evidence-based guidelines are available to select the best option based on personal and family history. NPs should utilize these guidelines in clinical practice to select the appropriate screening for their patients.

The rising incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Wisocky, Jessica; Paul, Sonali

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(7):14-20, July 15th, 2017.

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of liver disease in the United States and will soon be the leading indication for liver transplantation. NAFLD can lead to cirrhosis of the liver and is usually asymptomatic. Prompt referral to a hepatologist may halt the morbidity and mortality associated with NAFLD.