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Low health literacy: Implications for managing cardiac patients in practice

Hickey, Kathleen T., EdD, FNP-BC, ANP-BC, FAHA, FAAN; Masterson Creber, Ruth M., PhD, MSc, RN; Reading, Meghan, PhD, MPH, RN; Sciacca, Robert R., EngScD; Riga, Teresa C., BS; Frulla, Ashton P., NPC; Casida, Jesus M., PhD, RN, APN-C

doi: 10.1097/01.NPR.0000541468.54290.49
Feature: HEALTH LITERACY

Abstract: There are limited data on racial and ethnic disparities related to quality of life (QoL) and health literacy in adults with multiple cardiac conditions. This article evaluates the relationship between health literacy and QoL among patients with cardiac conditions in a multiethnic community in New York City.

There are limited data on racial and ethnic disparities related to quality of life (QoL) and health literacy in adults with multiple cardiac conditions. This article evaluates the relationship between health literacy and QoL among patients with cardiac conditions in a multiethnic community in New York City.

Kathleen T. Hickey is a professor of nursing and an NP at Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, N.Y.

Ruth M. Masterson Creber is an associate research scientist at Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, N.Y.

Meghan Reading is a doctoral student at Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, N.Y.

Robert R. Sciacca is a variable hours officer at Columbia University, New York, N.Y.

Teresa C. Riga is a clinical research coordinator at Columbia University Medical Center, New York, N.Y.

Ashton P. Frulla is a dermatology NP in New York, N.Y.

Jesus M. Casida is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan, School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, Mich.

The authors would like to acknowledge the National Institute of Nursing Research for their funding support with the following grants: R01NR014853, P30NR016587, and K99NR016275.

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