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Peanut allergy reduction in high-risk pediatric patients

Hopper, Jaime, MSN, FNP-C; Hopp, Courtney, MSN, FNP-C; Durbin, Jessica, DNP, FNP-BC

doi: 10.1097/01.NPR.0000530210.24654.36
Feature: FOOD ALLERGIES
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Abstract: The prevalence of food allergies has doubled in the past 10 years. Peanut allergies are a significant public health issue and are the primary reason for food-related anaphylactic reactions that result in death. Evidence supports that early introduction of the peanut protein (or in combination with immunotherapy) to the highly allergic may safely desensitize patients, which could lead to less adverse allergic reactions and alter allergy management overall.

The prevalence of food allergies has doubled in the past 10 years. Peanut allergies are a significant public health issue and are the primary reason for food-related anaphylactic reactions that result in death. Evidence supports that early introduction of the peanut protein (or in combination with immunotherapy) to the highly allergic may safely desensitize patients, which could lead to less adverse allergic reactions and alter allergy management overall.

Jaime Hopper is a cardiology NP at Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind.

Courtney Hopp is a palliative care NP at Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind.

Jessica Durbin is an assistant professor at Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Ind.

The authors and planners have disclosed no financial relationships related to this article.

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