Iodine Deficiency in Minority Populations of New Jersey : The Endocrinologist

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Case Report

Iodine Deficiency in Minority Populations of New Jersey

Kulczycki, Alexander MD; Wang, Xiangbing MD, PhD

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The Endocrinologist 19(2):p 62-63, March 2009. | DOI: 10.1097/TEN.0b013e318198b779

Abstract

Iodine-deficiency disorders are prevalent in regions with low soil iodine levels but have generally been eliminated in the United States through the widespread use of iodized salt. We report 2 cases of iodine deficiency in minority women living in Central New Jersey. Case 1: A 29-year-old Hispanic woman presented with possible hyperthyroidism. Examination showed a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland. Thyroid function tests were normal. An I123-uptake and scan demonstrated a 24-hour uptake of 72% and a diffusely enlarged gland with no focal nodules. A 24-hour urine showed an undetectable iodine level (<10 μg). Further discussion with the patient revealed that she actively avoided consumption of iodized salt and seafood. Case 2: A 39-year-old Asian American woman presented with goiter. Examination showed a diffusely enlarged gland with some asymmetry. Thyroid function tests were normal. An I123-uptake and scan showed a 24-hour uptake of 68.8% and a diffusely enlarged gland. A 24-hour urinary iodine collection showed subnormal levels of 30 μg. Like the previous patient, this one also actively avoided iodized salt and iodine-supplemented foods. Iodine-deficiency disorders can develop in minority populations even in iodine-replete environments. A full diet history including quantification of iodized salt and supplemented food intake should be obtained routinely as a part of the evaluation of patients with goiter. Measurement of urinary iodine excretion is warranted in suspicious cases. The treatment is as simple as adding iodized salt to the diet.

© 2009 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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