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The Three P's of Upper Extremity Surgery

Doyle, James R. M.D., Editor-in-Chief

Techniques in Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery: September 2002 - Volume 6 - Issue 3 - p 103
Editorial
Free

Emeritus Professor of Surgery (Orthopaedics),

John A. Burns School of Medicine,

University of Hawaii,

Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.A.

The P atient, the P rocedure, and the P rovider are three obvious components of the surgical equation. Selection of a procedure based on the patient's needs is a reflection of the surgeon's (a more suitable word than provider) experience, training, and skill. Matching the patient and procedure is a form of surgical judgment that is critical to the outcome of any procedure.

Techniques in Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery seeks to bring to its readers the latest in a wide variety of useful and proven surgical techniques developed by acknowledged experts. Matching the surgeon and the procedure is as equally important as matching the patient and the procedure. Not all matches are perfect, and it is incumbent on the surgeon to choose wisely when it comes to procedure and patient selection.

Macbeth's words to his antagonist Macduff, “Lay on, Macduff,” appropriately may be sometimes changed to, “Lay off, Macduff” (Shakespeare W. The Tragedy of Macbeth. Act 5, scene 8).

© 2002 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.