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Technique or Technician

Panchbhavi, Vinod K. MD, FACS

Techniques in Foot & Ankle Surgery: September 2019 - Volume 18 - Issue 3 - p 99
doi: 10.1097/BTF.0000000000000249
Editorial
Free

The author declares no conflict of interest.

When there are several techniques for a problem, the implication is that none of them will work well consistently or at all times or in everyone’s hands. Therefore, the search continues to find a technique that can work well at all times and in everyone’s hands. A particular technique or strategy may work very well in one person’s hands, which is why the phrase, ‘in my hands’ is familiar when an experienced and often senior surgeon defends or argues in favor of a technique. This is also why, at times, studies on a particular technique that evaluate the work of a single surgeon may not be replicated by others. In which case, the credit goes to skills exemplified by the technician rather than the reproducibility of the technique.

However, on the other hand, if the results of a particular technique can be easily and consistently reproduced by multiple surgeons, the credit goes more to the technique; such a technique is less demanding on the technician’s abilities or skills. Nevertheless, there is a component that can be attributed to the technician that is not always captured in studies of a technique.

Techniques in Foot & Ankle Surgery emphasizes and elaborates on the technique. You will not only find innovative techniques, but also subtle nuances and technical pearls from technicians who are internationally renowned authorities. We are grateful to the authors in this issue for their efforts and to Dr. Cesar de Netto, the issue Guest Editor, for addressing the challenging aspects of flat foot deformity correction and bringing in master technicians who reveal their secrets in getting the best out of different techniques.

Vinod K. Panchbhavi, MD, FACS

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