Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Early Routine Use of Upper GI Contrast Series Post Paraesophageal Hernia Repair

A Single Institution Consecutive Case Series

Robertson-More, Connal, MD*,†; Prasad, Shalvin, MD*,‡; Gill, Richdeep, MD, PhD*; Church, Neal, MD*; Mitchell, Philip, MD*; Debru, Estifanos, MD*

Surgical Laparoscopy Endoscopy & Percutaneous Techniques: June 2019 - Volume 29 - Issue 3 - p 203–206
doi: 10.1097/SLE.0000000000000643
Original Articles
Buy

Introduction: There is conflicting evidence with regard to the routine use of upper gastrointestinal contrast series in detecting early complications post paraesophageal hernia repair (PEHR).

Methods: All cases booked for a PEHR between January 2007 and September 2015 were identified using hospital records. Standard demographic, operation, and imaging data were extracted.

Results: We retrospectively identified 391 PEHR cases between January 2007 and September 2015. The mean age at the index operation was 66.7 years with a female predominance. The majority of index operations were elective and completed for a large paraesophageal hernia. Contrast studies were reported as normal in 70.6%, a leak in 0.3%, an obstruction in 27.9%, and early recurrence in 1.0%. Reoperation was required in 1.8% of cases.

Conclusion: Routine upper gastrointestinal contrast studies post-PEHR changed management in 0.8% of cases and were unhelpful in determining the need for early reoperation in 57.1% of cases requiring reoperation.

*Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK

Department of Surgery, Central Adelaide Health Network, Woodville South, SA, Australia

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Reprints: Connal Robertson-More, MD, Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, 1023 North Tower, 1403-29 Street NW, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 2T9 (e-mail: crobertsonmore@yahoo.com).

Received October 14, 2018

Accepted January 8, 2019

Copyright © 2019 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.