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Comparing Azithromycin and Doxycycline for the Treatment of Rectal Chlamydial Infection: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Khosropour, Christine M. MPH*; Dombrowski, Julia C. MD, MPH†‡; Barbee, Lindley A. MD, MPH†‡; Manhart, Lisa E. PhD; Golden, Matthew R. MD, MPH*†‡

doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0000000000000088
Original Study
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Background Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines recommend azithromycin or doxycycline for treatment of rectal chlamydial infection.

Methods We created a retrospective cohort of male patients diagnosed as having rectal chlamydia between 1993 and 2012 at a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Seattle, Washington. Men were included in the analysis if they were treated with azithromycin (1 g single dose) or doxycycline (100 mg twice a day × 7 days) within 60 days of chlamydia diagnosis and returned for repeat testing 14 to 180 days after treatment. We compared the risk of persistent/recurrent rectal chlamydial infection among recipients of the 2 drug regimens using 4 follow-up testing time intervals (14–30, 60, 90, and 180 days).

Results Of 1835 cases of rectal chlamydia diagnosed in the study period, 1480 (81%) were treated with azithromycin or doxycycline without a second drug active against Chlamydia trachomatis. Of these, 407 (33%) of 1231 azithromycin-treated men and 95 (38%) of 249 doxycycline-treated men were retested 14 to 180 days after treatment (P = 0.12); 88 (22%) and 8 (8%), respectively, had persistent/recurrent infection (P = 0.002). Persistent/recurrent infection was higher among men treated with azithromycin compared with doxycycline at 14 to 30 days (4/53 [8%] vs. 0/20 [0%]), 14 to 60 days (23/136 [17%] vs. 0/36 [0%]), and 14 to 90 days (50/230 [22%] vs. 2/56 [4%]). In multivariate analysis, azithromycin-treated men had a significantly higher risk of persistent/recurrent infection in the 14 to 90 days (adjusted relative risk, 5.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3–21.0) and 14 to 180 days (adjusted relative risk, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.2–4.8) after treatment.

Conclusions These data suggest that doxycycline may be more effective than azithromycin in the treatment of rectal chlamydial infections.

Among male sexually transmitted disease clinic patients with rectal chlamydial infection, treatment with azithromycin was associated with a significantly higher risk of persistent/recurrent rectal chlamydia compared with treatment with doxycycline.

From the Departments of *Epidemiology and †Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; ‡Public Health–Seattle & King County HIV/STD Program, Seattle, WA; and §Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Acknowledgments: The authors thank the Public Health–Seattle & King County STD staff, clinicians, and disease investigation specialists.

Conflict of interests: M.R.G. has received research support from Cempra Pharmaceuticals, Bio-rad Diagnostics, and Genprobe Diagnostics. All other authors report no conflict of interests.

Funding: This work was supported by Public Health–Seattle & King County, the National Institutes of Health (NIH; Grant Nos. K23MH090923 to J.C.D. and T32 AI07140 to L.A.B.), and the University of Washington Center for AIDS Research, an NIH-funded program (Grant No. P30 AI027757), which is supported by the following NIH institutes and centers: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Career Institute; National Institutes of Mental Health; National Institute on Drug Abuse; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; and National Institute on Aging.

Correspondence: Christine M. Khosropour, MPH, Department of Epidemiology, Harborview Medical Center, Box 359777, 325 Ninth Ave, Seattle, WA 98104. E-mail: ckhosro@u.washington.edu.

Received for publication September 11, 2013, and accepted December 2, 2013.

Rectal chlamydial infection is a common bacterial sexually transmitted infection among men who have sex with men (MSM). In 2011, 11% of HIV-negative MSM and 21% of HIV-positive MSM attending a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in the US tested positive for Chlamydia trachomatis in the rectum.1 More than half of all chlamydial infections among MSM are rectal infections,2,3 which are also more prevalent than urethral and rectal gonorrhea.3–5

Although rectal infections with gonorrhea and/or chlamydia are predominately asymptomatic,3 they are associated with an increased risk of HIV acquisition6–9 and may play a key role in sustaining high levels of chlamydia transmission among MSM. Consequently, screening MSM for these infections may be a cost-effective HIV prevention strategy10 and could be a critical component in the control of chlamydial infections in MSM.

These benefits of screening depend on the success of treatment. Currently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends doxycycline (100 mg orally twice daily for 7 days) or azithromycin (1 g orally once) for treatment of rectal chlamydia.11 However, few data on the efficacy of these regimens in the treatment of rectal chlamydia exist, and current guidelines primarily reflect an extrapolation of findings from randomized trials demonstrating that the 2 therapies are equally efficacious in the treatment of urogenital chlamydial infections.12

To date, no randomized trials have directly compared azithromycin and doxycycline for the treatment of rectal chlamydia. The sole published observational study13 comparing the 2 drugs found that azithromycin was associated with a significantly higher rate of treatment failure than doxycycline.

We conducted a retrospective analysis to evaluate the risk of persistent/recurrent rectal chlamydial infection associated with treatment with azithromycin compared with doxycycline.

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MATERIALS AND METHODS

Study Design and Population

We created a retrospective cohort of all male patients who tested positive for rectal chlamydial infections in an STD clinic in Seattle, Washington, between 1993 and 2012. Women were excluded because they were not routinely screened for rectal chlamydia during the study period.

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Data Collection and Measures

All data were obtained as part of routine medical care and recorded in the clinic’s electronic database. Clinicians used standardized instruments to record information about patient symptoms, concurrent sexually transmitted infections, and physical examination findings. Until October 2010, information on patient demographics (e.g., age, race), behavior (e.g., self-reported number of sex partners, self-reported contact to a sex partner with chlamydia), and STD history (e.g., self-reported prior chlamydial infection) was also collected by clinicians on standardized forms; thereafter, these data were routinely obtained from English-speaking patients using a computer-assisted self-interview.

Throughout the study period, clinic protocol was to obtain rectal specimens from all male patients who reported receptive anal sex in the prior year. Between 1993 and September 2010, the clinic tested rectal specimens for chlamydia using McCoy cell culture.14 Beginning in October 2010, the clinic tested all rectal specimens using nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) (APTIMA Combo 2; GenProbe Diagnostics, San Diego, CA).

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Definition of Treatment and Outcome

Per CDC treatment guidelines,11 men who tested positive for rectal chlamydia were treated with azithromycin (1 g orally once) or doxycycline (100 mg orally twice daily for 7 days), at the clinician’s discretion. The treatment regimen was recorded by clinic staff on a standardized form. Clinicians treated men presumptively at the time of the initial evaluation if they reported recent sexual contact to a partner diagnosed as having gonorrhea, chlamydia, or nongonococcal urethritis.

We limited the analytic sample to men who were treated within 60 days of diagnosis to minimize the effect of spontaneous resolution of infection15 on our study outcome. We further excluded men who were cotreated with a quinolone or amoxicillin because both drugs have some activity against C. trachomatis. We also excluded men from the analysis if they were treated with a doxycycline or azithromycin regimen other than those recommended in the 2010 CDC STD treatment guidelines.11

We defined the outcome of interest, persistent/recurrent rectal chlamydial infection, as having a positive result on the first repeat test for rectal chlamydia obtained in the 14 to 180 days after the date of treatment. We only included repeat test outcomes if they were obtained using the same testing method (culture or NAAT) as that used for the initial diagnosis. Per CDC guidelines,11 men with rectal chlamydial infection were not asked to return to the clinic for a test of cure; thus, there was no active follow-up of the study population. We compared treatment outcomes in 4 repeat testing time intervals (defined as the number of days from the date of treatment): 14 to 30, 14 to 60, 14 to 90, and 14 to 180 days. We excluded tests occurring less than 14 days after treatment to diminish the risk of false-positive tests.16–18 Evaluating multiple testing intervals allowed us to maximize the number of follow-up tests included in the analysis, while also permitting an assessment of outcomes among men tested early after treatment (when the risk of reinfection is presumably low) and among men tested over a longer period (when the risk of reinfection as opposed to treatment failure is higher).

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Statistical Analysis

We used Pearson χ2 tests (for categorical variables) and t tests assuming unequal variance (for continuous variables) to compare characteristics of men who did and did not return for a repeat test and, among those who returned for a repeat test, to compare characteristics of men who received azithromycin versus doxycycline.

Our primary analysis aimed to compare the risk of persistent/recurrent rectal infection among men treated with azithromycin compared with men treated with doxycycline, in each repeat test interval defined above. We used Fisher exact test to analyze statistically significant differences in the proportion of persistent/recurrent rectal chlamydial infection among men treated with the 2 therapies. We used log binomial models to estimate the unadjusted and adjusted relative risk (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) of persistent/recurrent infection associated with treatment with azithromycin versus doxycycline. We conducted 2 multivariate analyses to control for potential confounding of the association of treatment regimen with persistent/recurrent infection. First, we developed a multivariate model that included factors associated with receipt of azithromycin or doxycycline in our population and that we defined a priori as being plausibly associated with persistent/recurrent infection. These adjustment factors included the following: anorectal symptoms, diagnosis of proctitis, contact to a chlamydial-infected partner, testing method, and year of diagnosis. We also included number of male sex partners in the 2 months before initial diagnosis (modeled as a continuous variable) to serve as a surrogate for sexual risk behaviors between initial and follow-up testing because our clinic did not collect standardized data on sexual behavior between treatment and follow-up testing. A second multivariate model included a larger array of factors, including demographic (e.g., age, race), clinical (e.g. proctitis), and behavioral (e.g., methamphetamine use; number of sex partners, modeled categorically). This analysis used log binomial models to estimate the association between each characteristic and persistent/recurrent infection. We performed a backward, stepwise elimination to identify factors significantly associated (P < 0.10) with persistent/recurrent infection. Because testing method is a known confounder, we maintained that variable in the model during the backward elimination procedure. We report the bivariate and multivariate RR with 95% CI.

We conducted 2 separate sensitivity analyses. First, we defined an additional repeat test time interval of 21 to 42 days after treatment. We chose this lower bound because repeat testing for rectal chlamydia before 21 days may detect residual nucleic acid from nonviable organisms11; the upper bound of 42 days decreases the probability that repeat test positivity is due to reinfection and conforms to the timing of testing used in randomized trials of urethral chlamydia and observational studies of rectal chlamydia.12,13,19,20 Second, we stratified our analytic sample by test method (culture vs. NAAT), to control for confounding by test method. We examined the outcomes of these men in the 14 to 90 and 14 to 180 days after treatment. For each sensitivity analysis, we used Fisher exact tests to compare the proportion of persistent/recurrent infection by therapy received.

All analyses were performed using Stata statistical software, version 12.2 (StataCorp, College Station, TX). Unless stated otherwise, tests were performed at a significance level of 0.05. Study procedures and analyses were approved by the University of Washington Human Subjects Division.

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RESULTS

Clinicians diagnosed a total of 1461 unique MSM with 1835 cases of rectal chlamydia infection over the course of the study period. Of these, 1545 (84%) were treated in our clinic with azithromycin or doxycycline within 60 days of diagnosis, of whom 1505 (97%) received a standard regimen (1 g orally once or 100 mg twice daily for 7 days, respectively). Of these, 1480 (98%) did not receive a cotreatment with a quinolone or amoxicillin and were included in the analysis. The majority (81%; n = 1199) were treated within 1 week of diagnosis; only 8 (<1%) men were treated 30 to 60 days after testing.

The mean age of all treated cases was 32 years, approximately two-thirds of patients were white and more than 70% were HIV negative (Table 1). Approximately 34% of treated cases (502/1480) returned for a repeat rectal chlamydia test 14 to 180 days after treatment. Demographic and behavioral characteristics were comparable among men who did and did not return for a repeat test. However, men with a repeat test were significantly more likely to have had a chlamydial infection in the 12 months before their diagnosis (P = 0.005), more likely to have a symptomatic infection (P = 0.03), and less likely to report having a sex partner with chlamydia (P = 0.03) compared with men who did not return for a repeat test. Repeat testing did not significantly differ by therapy received: 407 (33%) of the 1231 men treated with azithromycin and 95 (38%) of the 249 men treated with doxycycline had a repeat test within 14 to 180 days of treatment (P = 0.12).

TABLE 1

TABLE 1

Of the 502 men who returned for a repeat test in the 14 to 180 days after treatment, 81% were treated with azithromycin and 19% were treated with doxycycline (Table 1). Among patients who were retested, there were no statistically significant differences in demographic or behavioral characteristics between men treated with azithromycin or doxycycline. Treatment with azithromycin was more common after 2009; consequently, testing by NAAT was significantly more likely among azithromycin-treated cases compared with doxycycline-treated cases (P = 0.003). Men treated with doxycycline were more likely than those treated with azithromycin to have a symptomatic infection (P = 0.005) and a diagnosis of proctitis (P < 0.001), but slightly less likely to report having a sex partner with C. trachomatis infection (P = 0.06). The median length of time between treatment and repeat testing was 84 days (interquartile range [IQR], 49–118) for azithromycin-treated patients and 83 days (IQR, 32–131) for doxycycline-treated patients.

At each repeat test interval, persistent/recurrent infection was higher among men treated with azithromycin compared with those treated with doxycycline (Table 2). Adjusting for potential confounders, treatment with azithromycin (compared with treatment with doxycycline) was significantly associated with a 5-fold higher risk of persistent/recurrent infection 14 to 90 days after treatment and a 2-fold higher risk of persistent/recurrent infection 14 to 180 days after treatment.

TABLE 2

TABLE 2

The significant association of treatment regimen with persistent/recurrent infection persisted in the second multivariate analysis (Table 3). Other factors independently associated with persistent/recurrent infection included having 5 or more sex partners in the 2 months before the initial diagnosis and being a known contact to a chlamydia-infected partner at the time of initial diagnosis.

TABLE 3

TABLE 3

Using an alternate time interval of 21 to 42 days from treatment to repeat testing produced results similar to our primary analysis: 12 (17%) of 69 azithromycin-treated men and 0 (0%) of 20 doxycycline-treated men had persistent/recurrent infection in the 21 to 42 days after treatment (P = 0.06).

Among men tested by culture, those treated with azithromycin were significantly more likely to have persistent/recurrent infection compared with those treated with doxycycline (Table 4). Persistent/recurrent infection among patients tested by NAAT was also higher for patients treated with azithromycin compared with those treated with doxycycline, although there were few men treated with doxycycline in the period after our clinic adopted NAAT testing of rectal specimens, and this difference was not statistically significant.

TABLE 4

TABLE 4

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DISCUSSION

In this population of male STD clinic patients diagnosed as having rectal chlamydia between 1993 and 2012, we found that men treated with azithromycin had a significantly higher risk of persistent/recurrent rectal chlamydial infection compared with men treated with doxycycline. This association was consistent across several repeat test time intervals and was observed when all testing was done using culture and after our clinic switched to routinely test rectal specimens using NAAT. Together, these data suggest that a 7-day course of doxycycline may be superior to a single 1-g dose of azithromycin in the treatment of rectal chlamydial infection.

Our findings are largely consistent with prior observational studies. In the only previously published study directly comparing the 2 regimens, Hathorn and colleagues reported that 11 (26.2%) of 42 azithromycin-treated patients and 2 (5.0%) of 40 of doxycycline-treated patients had repeat positive NAAT test results for C. trachomatis 6 weeks after treatment (P = 0.014).13 Although Hathorn et al. did not account for differences in sexual behavior between the 2 treatment groups, other noncomparative studies of cohorts treated either with azithromycin or doxycycline also suggest that doxycycline may be the superior therapy. De Vries et al.21 observed persistent/recurrent rectal infection in only 1 (3.8%) of 26 doxycycline-treated men at 6 weeks, and Elgalib et al.22 found persistent/recurrent infections in 2 (1%) of 165 doxycycline-treated men tested a median of 45 days after treatment. In contrast, although Elgalib et al. excluded azithromycin-treated men from their primary analysis, 4 (15.4%) of 26 men receiving the drug had a persistent/recurrent infection at their test-of-cure visit. A second UK observational study of rectal chlamydial infection found that 9 (13%) of 68 azithromycin-treated men who retested at 6 weeks were infected,23 whereas a study in Australia reported persistent/recurrent rectal infections in 7 (15%) of 47 azithromycin-treated men retested within 3 months of treatment.24 Together, these studies present a consistent picture suggesting that doxycycline confers a lower risk of persistent/recurrent rectal chlamydial infection than azithromycin.

We postulate a number of reasons for the decreased effectiveness of azithromycin relative to doxycycline that we observed. First, although the high tissue concentration and long half-life of azithromycin25–27 make it an attractive therapy for rectal infection, we are not aware of any studies that have measured the concentration of azithromycin in the rectum. It is possible that rectal tissue penetration of azithromycin is poor or inferior to that of doxycycline. Second, and related to this, there may be differences in the pharmacokinetic properties of the 2 drugs that have not been elucidated but could explain our findings. Third, the high bacterial load of C. trachomatis in the rectum28 may foster the development of subpopulations of C. trachomatis that are less susceptible to certain antimicrobials (i.e., heterotypic resistance).29–31 Finally, doxycycline may decrease bacterial load more quickly than azithromycin and, consequently, might seem to be more effective. However, this seems unlikely to explain our findings among men retested many weeks after treatment.

Our study has several strengths. To our knowledge, this study is the largest to date to compare the efficacy of azithromycin and doxycycline for the treatment of rectal chlamydial infection and the first undertaken in the United States. Our clinic systematically obtains data on sexual behavior, and this allowed us to adjust for several possible confounding factors, strengthening the likelihood that the observed differences were real. Indeed, our primary finding that azithromycin seems to be inferior to doxycycline in the treatment of rectal chlamydial infections was extremely robust across time intervals and diagnostic testing modalities.

Our findings are also subject to several important limitations. First and foremost, this was an observational study, not a randomized trial, and we cannot eliminate the possibility that our results are due to confounding. Patients may have been treated with 1 of the 2 therapies based on certain factors that are prognostic of persistent/recurrent infection (i.e., confounding by indication). We attempted to address this issue through multivariable analysis, and this adjustment for confounders did not alter the significant association of azithromycin with persistent/recurrent infection. However, we did not measure several potential confounders (e.g., sex with anonymous partners, number of receptive anal sex partners), we assessed others using only a binary global measurement (e.g., ever used methamphetamine), and we could not measure unknown confounders. We were also concerned that our findings might reflect a change in testing methods from culture to NAATs because our clinic transitioned toward greater use of azithromycin during the same period that it switched from culture to NAAT testing of rectal chlamydial infection in 2010 to 2011. However, adjusting for testing method did not affect our principal finding, and the strong association of azithromycin with persistent/recurrent infection remained evident when we stratified our analysis by test type. Second, owing to the retrospective study design, there was no active follow-up of this study population and men included in this analysis were only those who returned for a repeat test 14 to 180 days after treatment. Third, we cannot differentiate between persistent infection and reinfection. Clinicians in our clinic do not systematically collect information from patients returning for follow-up testing about reexposure to infected or untreated partners; thus, it is likely that at least some of the persistent/recurrent infections are the result of reinfection. Men treated with azithromycin may have experienced a higher risk of persistent/recurrent infection because of earlier resumption of posttreatment sexual activity, although we believe that this is unlikely to explain the large difference in risk we observed. Fourth, our clinic does not routinely test specimens for lymphogranuloma venereum, so we cannot assess differences in outcomes among men with and without lymphogranuloma venereum. Finally, our study population was predominantly white and relatively old compared with some STD clinic populations, and our findings may not be generalizable to populations that are substantially different from the one studied here.

In conclusion, we found that azithromycin was associated with a significantly higher risk of persistent/recurrent rectal chlamydial infection than doxycycline. These findings add to the limited but growing body of evidence suggesting that azithromycin may be inferior to doxycycline in the treatment of rectal chlamydia. A randomized controlled trial is needed to definitively determine the best therapy for patients with rectal chlamydial infection.

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