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Prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Among Persons 14 to 39 Years of Age, United States, 1999 to 2008

Torrone, Elizabeth A. MSPH, PhD; Johnson, Robert E. MD; Tian, Lin H. MD, MS; Papp, John R. PhD; Datta, S. Deblina MD; Weinstock, Hillard S. MD, MPH

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: March 2013 - Volume 40 - Issue 3 - p 202–205
doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0b013e31827c5a71
Original Study

Background Prevalence estimates from population-based surveys do not suffer from the same biases as case-report and clinic positivity data and may be better to monitor sexually transmitted disease morbidity over time.

Methods We estimated the prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in a nationally representative sample of persons aged 14 to 39 years participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Results From 1999 to 2008, the overall prevalence of gonorrhea was 0.27% (95% confidence interval, 0.13%–0.47%). In the 2005 to 2006 and 2007 to 2008 cycles, prevalence approached 0% and was based on too few positive sample persons to obtain reliable estimates. In 2004, most infections were found in 1 survey location.

Discussion Given the low prevalence and geographic clustering of disease, gonorrhea estimates from national probability surveys are often imprecise and unstable. In 2008, gonorrhea testing in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was discontinued. Continued surveillance of gonorrhea should include case reporting and prevalence estimates from local surveys and sentinel surveillance systems.

Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we estimated the prevalence of Neisserig agonorrhoeae in a nationally representative sample of persons aged 14 to 39 years.

From the Division of STD Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

The authors thank Carol E. Farshy, MPH, CHES; Geraldine M. McQuillan, PhD.

No conflicts of interest to report.

The findings and conclusions in this manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Correspondence: Elizabeth A. Torrone, MSPH, PhD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mail Stop E-02, Atlanta, GA 30333. E-mail: ETorrone@cdc.gov.

Received for publication May 4, 2012, and accepted November 2, 2012.

© Copyright 2013 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association