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Increasing Public Health Partner Services for Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Results of a Second National Survey

Katz, David A. MPH*; Hogben, Matthew PHD; Dooley, Samuel W. Jr MD; Golden, Matthew R. MD, MPH*§¶

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: August 2010 - Volume 37 - Issue 8 - p 469-475
doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0b013e3181e7104d
Original Study

Background: Recent US national efforts taken to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have emphasized HIV case-finding, including partner services (PS).

Methods: We collected data on HIV PS procedures and outcomes in 2006 from health departments in US metropolitan areas with the highest number of cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, gonorrhea, chlamydial infection, and primary and secondary syphilis, and compared our results with the data collected through a similar study carried out in 2001.

Results: Of the 71 eligible jurisdictions, 51 (72%) participated in this study. In 2006, health departments interviewed 11,270 (43%) of the 26,185 persons with newly reported HIV, which was an increase from the 32% reported in 2001 (P < 0.01). Among 10,498 potentially exposed partners, 2228 (21%) had been previously diagnosed with HIV, 803 (8%) were newly HIV-diagnosed, 3337 (32%) tested HIV-negative, and 4130 (39%) were not successfully notified, were notified but refused HIV testing and denied previous diagnosis, or did not have an outcome recorded. Combining data from all jurisdictions, public health staff needed to interview 13.6 persons with HIV to identify one new case of infection; this number was unchanged from 2001 (13.8; P = 0.75).

Conclusion: In the United States, the proportion of persons diagnosed with HIV receiving PS has increased since 2001, whereas HIV case-finding yields have remained stable. Despite this, most people newly diagnosed with HIV still do not receive PS.

A national survey of United States health departments found that, although the proportion of persons diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus receiving partner services has increased since 2001, most people newly diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus in 2006 did not receive these services.

From the *Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; †Division of STD Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA; ‡Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA; §Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; and ¶Public Health—Seattle and King County, Seattle, WA

The findings and conclusions in this manuscript represent those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Correspondence: David A. Katz, MPH, International AIDS Research and Training Program, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Ave, Box 359909, Seattle, WA 98104. E-mail: dkatz7@u.washington.edu.

Received for publication October 10, 2009, and accepted January 21, 2010.

© Copyright 2010 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association