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Risk Factors for Bacterial Vaginosis Incidence in Young Adult Thai Women

RUGPAO, SUNGWAL MD, MSc*; SRIPLIENCHAN, SOMCHAI MD, MPH; RUNGRUENGTHANAKIT, KITTIPONG MSc; LAMLERTKITTIKUL, SURACHAI MD§; PINJAREON, SUTHAM MD; WERAWATAKUL, YUTHAPONG MD; RUENGKRIS, TOSAPORN MD**; SINCHAI, WANIDA MD††; LIMTRAKUL, ARAM MD‡‡; KOONLERTKIT, SOMPONG MD*; MORRISON, CHARLES S. PhD§§; CELENTANO, DAVID D. PhD

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: July 2008 - Volume 35 - Issue 7 - p 643-648
doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0b013e31816f70f2
Article

Objective: To determine risk factors for incident bacterial vaginosis (BV) in young Thai women.

Study Design: Prospective data from a cohort of 1522 women aged 18 to 35 years, who were enrolled in a study of hormonal contraception and HIV acquisition, were used to evaluate potential risk factors for BV, as diagnosed by Amsel criteria.

Results: The median prevalence of BV from 3 to 24 months of follow-up visits was 2.5%. The BV incidence was 10.0 per 100-woman years. Statistically significant factors in multivariable analysis were sex during menstruation [hazard ratio (HR), 1.80; 95% CI, 1.11–2.92], male partners having sex with other women (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.45–2.98), cigarette smoking (HR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.08–2.98), and trichomoniasis (HR, 15.68; 95% CI, 4.95–49.68). Intravaginal practices were not associated with incident BV in unadjusted or adjusted analysis.

Conclusions: This study supports the association between sexual behaviors and the incident BV. Failure to detect an association between intravaginal practices and incident BV warrants further studies in high-risk populations or in women with a higher prevalence of intravaginal practices.

Sexual behaviors, but not intravaginal practices were found to be associated with incident BV in young adult Thai women attending family planning clinics.

From the *Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; †Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; ‡Research Institute for Health Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; §Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hat Yai Hospital, Songkla, Thailand; ¶Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkla, Thailand; ∥Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; **Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rajavithi Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand; ††Health Promotion Center, Region 6, Khon Kaen, Thailand; ‡‡Health Promotion Center, Region 10, Chiang Mai, Thailand; and §§Family Health International, Durham, North Carolina

Correspondence: Sungwal Rugpao, MD, MSc, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand. E-mail: surugpao@mail.med.cmu.ac.th.

Received for publication May 21, 2007, and accepted February 10, 2008.

© Copyright 2008 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association