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HIV-Related Risk Behaviors and History of Sexually Transmitted Diseases Among Male Migrants Who Patronize Commercial Sex in China

Wang, Bo PhD*; Li, Xiaoming PhD*; Stanton, Bonita MD*; Fang, Xiaoyi PhD; Lin, Danhua PhD; Mao, Rong PhD

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: January 2007 - Volume 34 - Issue 1 - p 1-8
doi: 10.1097/01.olq.0000222668.95038.03
Article

Background and Objective: Men who pay for sexual services are at increased risk for HIV/sexually transmitted disease. Data on the sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics of such men in China are limited.

Study Design: Two cross-sectional surveys, using similar instruments, were completed among Chinese migrants in Beijing, Shanghai, and Nanjing in 2002. A total of 1304 rural-to-urban migrant men from community settings (“community sample”) and 465 migrant men attending sexually transmitted disease clinics (“STD clinic sample”) were included in the current study.

Results: Ten percent of men in the community sample and 32.7% of men in the STD clinic sample reported having ever paid for sex. Nearly 20% of clients from the community sample and 60% of clients from the STD clinic sample reported a history of STDs. For both the community and STD clinic samples, working at industrial or construction sectors, multiple sexual partners, regular sex partner having sex with others, and a history of drug use were associated with being a male client. In addition, perceived peer sexual risk and perceived vulnerability to STD were associated with being a male client in the community sample, and a history of STD and being tested for STD/HIV were associated with being a male client in the STD sample.

Conclusion: Male migrants who paid for sex in China were vulnerable to HIV/STDs. HIV prevention efforts should target young migrant men who work at factory and construction sectors. STD clinics may be important sites for outreach and intervention efforts among male clients.

Working at industrial or construction sectors, multiple sexual partners, regular sexual partner having sex with others, and a history of drug use were associated with being a male client.

From *The Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics Prevention Research Center, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan; the †Beijing Normal University Institute of Developmental Psychology, Beijing, China; and the ‡Nanjing University Institute of Mental Health, Nanjing, China

The authors thank Dr. Lizeng Su and Dr. Hongshia Zhang and other faculty members and graduate students in Beijing Normal University and Nanjing University for their efforts in data collection.

The research on which this article is based was supported by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) (grant number R01MH64878).

Correspondence: Bo Wang, PhD, The Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics Prevention Research Center, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4201 Saint Antoine Street, UHC 6-D, Detroit, MI 48201. E-mail: bwang@med.wayne.edu.

Received for publication October 11, 2005, and accepted March 17, 2006.

© Copyright 2007 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association