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Prevalence Trends in Chlamydial Infections Among Young Women Entering the National Job Training Program, 1998–2004

Joesoef, M Riduan MD, PhD; Mosure, Debra J. PhD

doi: 10.1097/01.olq.0000204516.38760.9c
Article

Objectives: To assess the trends and risk factors of chlamydial infections in disadvantaged women aged 16 to 24 years entering a national job training program.

Goal: To assess the impact of chlamydia screening program on chlamydia trend.

Study Design: The authors calculated the prevalence of chlamydia by demographic and geographic characteristics from 106,377 women who were screened from 1998 through 2004.

Results: Chlamydia prevalence was inversely associated with age, decreasing from 12.7% in women aged 16 to 17 years to 6.6% in women aged 22 to 24 years. Blacks had the highest prevalence (13.1%). Chlamydia prevalence significantly decreased from 11.7% in 1998 to 10.0% in 2003 and then slightly increased to 10.3% in 2004. After direct standardization and adjustment for the laboratory test type, a similar trend was observed by age and race/ethnicities.

Conclusions: Among disadvantaged women aged 16 to 24 years entering a national job training program, the chlamydia prevalence and racial disparities in prevalence were consistently high from 1998 to 2004, especially among younger black women.

Among disadvantaged women aged 16–24 years entering a national job training program, the chlamydia prevalence and racial disparities in prevalence were consistently high from 1998 to 2004.

From the Division of STD Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia

LaZetta Grier, data manager for the project (the data reported here have been provided by the National Job Training Program). Hillard Weinstock gave thoughtful comments and assisted in editing of the manuscript.

Correspondence: M. R. Joesoef, Division of STD Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1600 Clifton Road NE, Mail Stop E-02, Atlanta, GA 30333. E-mail: mrj1@cdc.gov.

© Copyright 2006 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association