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Prevalence and Incidence of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease in Incarcerated Adolescents

CROMWELL, POLLY F. RN, MSN, CPNP*; RISSER, WILLIAM L. MD, PhD*; RISSER, JAN M. H. PhD

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: July 2002 - Volume 29 - Issue 7 - p 391-396
Article

Background Few recent studies have determined the prevalence and incidence of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) among adolescents.

Goal The goal of this study was to determine these parameters among incarcerated youths.

Study Design Both on admission and during incarceration, consecutive adolescents entering the Harris County, Texas, Juvenile Detention Center were evaluated for symptoms of PID. One of two experienced clinicians examined adolescents with possible PID. For the diagnosis of PID, we used the minimal criteria of the CDC.

Results In sexually active heterosexual or bisexual adolescents (N = 313), the prevalence of PID at admission was 4.5%; during the first 31 days of incarceration, the incidence density of PID was 3.3 cases/100 person-months, and the cumulative incidence was 2.2%. The prevalence among these youths of chlamydial and/or gonorrheal infection, as determined by urine or cervical testing, was 24.9%.

Conclusion The high prevalence and incidence of PID underscore the need for effective programs to eradicate chlamydial and gonorrheal infections in high-risk youths.

Incarcerated youths in Houston were found to have a high prevalence and incidence of pelvic inflammatory disease.

From the *Medical School, Department of Pediatrics, and School of Public Health, University of Texas–Houston Health Sciences Center, Houston, Texas

The authors thank the nursing staff of the Harris County Juvenile Detention Center for their help with the chlamydia screening program and the gynecologic care; the administration for their support of the best possible medical care for incarcerated youths; and the Houston Department of Health and Human Services for laboratory testing.

Correspondence: William L. Risser, MD, PhD, Department of Pediatrics, UTHMS, PO Box 20708, Houston, Texas 77225-0708.

Received for publication July 17, 2001,

revised October 16, 2001, and accepted October 18, 2001.

© Copyright 2002 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association