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Risk Factors for Incident and Recurrent Condylomata Acuminata Among Men: A Population-Based Study

VAN DEN EEDEN, STEPHEN K. PhD*,†; HABEL, LAUREL A. MPH*,†; SHERMAN, KAREN J. PhD*; MCKNIGHT, BARBARA PhD*,‡; STERGACHIS, ANDY PhD†,§; DALING, JANET R. PhD*,†

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: July 1998 - Volume 25 - Issue 6 - p 278–284
Original Articles

Background and Objectives: The rapid increase in the number of physician office visits for condylomata acuminata and the association of human papillomavirus and cancer has prompted renewed interest in the epidemiology of this sexually-transmitted disease. Few epidemiologic studies have examined what risk factors are associated with condylomata acuminata in men.

Goal: To determine what factors may predispose a man to the occurrence of condylomata acuminata.

Study Design: A population-based case-control study was conducted among male members of a health maintenance organization. Patients were men 18 years or older who were seen for condyloma at one of four primary care clinics of Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound between April 1, 1987 and September 30, 1991. Control subjects were frequency matched to the patients on clinic site, race, and age. In-person interviews were used to ascertain exposure histories from both patients and control subjects.

Results: Recurrent condyloma was reported by about one third of our patients. Patients with multiple partners were strongly associated with developing the disease. Several factors were either more strongly or only associated with recurrent disease. Other behavioral measures, such as recreational drug use, were also related the occurrence of condyloma.

Conclusion: These results confirm the sexual-transmitted mechanism of condyloma in men. Exposure to multiple partners was associated with elevated risk of both recurrent and incident disease. Other cofactors may be involved in the etiology of condyloma.

* From the Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington; and the Departments of †Epidemiology and ‡Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, and the §Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

The authors are grateful to Katherine Reiss, Dan Edelson, Shirley Opsted, Janelle Jacobs, and Melinda Andrews for their assistance in the conduct of this study.

Supported by National Cancer Institute Grant 1 PO1 CA 42792.

Reprint requests: Janet R. Daling, PhD, Weiss/Daling Studies, MP 381, Fred Hutchinson Research Center, 1124 Columbia Street, Seattle, WA 98104.

Received for publication October 24, 1997, revised March 18, 1998, and accepted March 19, 1998.

© Copyright 1998 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association