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00152232-201000002-00021AbstractSpine: Affiliated Society Meeting AbstractsSpine: Affiliated Society Meeting Abstracts© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. p 62–63Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire-Scoliosis Version: Discriminant Validity in AISPaper #21Podium Presentation AbstractsAhn, Jennifer MS; Penn, Phedra MS; Bharucha, Neil; Auerbach, Joshua D. MD; Shah, Suken A. MD; Lonner, Baron S. MDUnited StatesSummary: The BIDQ-S has been validated for internal consistency and construct validity in AIS patients. To establish discriminant validity, 75 operative and non-operative AIS patients and 205 healthy adolescents completed the BIDQ-S. Analysis revealed a significant difference in scores between the groups (1.55 vs. 1.08, p<0.001), between females of the groups (1.59 vs. 1.05, p<0.001), and between males of the groups (1.44 vs. 1.09, p<0.001). This finding further validates the BIDQ-S as a reliable and unique tool to assess psychosocial outcomes of AIS.Introduction: Psychosocial construct measurements have become increasingly valuable in evaluating the impact of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) on patients. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire-Scoliosis Version (BIDQ-S) has been validated for internal consistency and construct validity in 50 AIS patients, proving to be a reliable instrument for measuring appearance-related distress in this population. The purpose of this study was to establish discriminant validity of the BIDQ-S by comparing responses of operative and non-operative AIS patients with those of normal adolescents without AIS.Methods: 75 AIS patients (age: 14.0; 80% F), and 205 healthy adolescents without AIS (age: 16.1; 50.9% F) were enrolled into a single-center, cross-sectional study. Subjects completed two self-report questionnaires: the BIDQ-S and a race/demographic form. Patients completed them pre-treatment. Independent sample t-tests and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated.Results: There was a significant difference in BIDQ-S scores between AIS patients and healthy adolescents (1.55 vs. 1.08, p<0.001), between females of the groups (1.59 vs. 1.05, p<0.001), between males of the groups (1.44 vs. 1.09, p<0.001) and between non-operative AIS patients and healthy adolescents (1.51 vs. 1.08, p<0.001), establishing discriminant validity of the questionnaire. There was no significant effect of age, race, or BMI on BIDQ-S scores in each group. The difference in BIDQ-S scores between operative and non-operative AIS patients did not reach significance (1.58 vs. 1.51 p=0.50) despite greater curve severity in operative patients (major cobb: 50.9° vs. 24.0°, p<0.001). There was no significant difference in scores between male and female AIS patients.Conclusion: In contrast to healthy adolescents in the general population, the scores of AIS patients are indicative of greater back-related body image disturbance and social impairment as a result of this distress. This finding further validates the BIDQ-S as a unique tool to quantify psychosocial disease outcomes for AIS.<strong xmlns:mrws="http://webservices.ovid.com/mrws/1.0">Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire-Scoliosis Version: Discriminant Validity in AIS</strong>: <strong xmlns:mrws="http://webservices.ovid.com/mrws/1.0">Paper #21</strong>Ahn Jennifer MS; Penn, Phedra MS; Bharucha, Neil; Auerbach, Joshua D. MD; Shah, Suken A. MD; Lonner, Baron S. MDPodium Presentation AbstractsPodium Presentation Abstractsp 62-63