Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Administration of Sodium Ibandronate in the Treatment of Complicated Giant Cell Tumor of the Spine

Zhang, Wei, MD*; Zhang, Yuming, MD*; Li, Pengfei, MD*; Rhodesm, Steven D., MD; Wang, Yunxia, MD*; Xue, Xingkui, MD; Dong, Yuchang, MD*; Ding, Wenyuan, MD*; Shen, Yong, MD*; Zhang, Biao, MD*

doi: 10.1097/BRS.0b013e3182127f91
Case Report
Buy

Study design. Case study.

Objective. To present three complicated cases of giant cell tumor of the spine treated with sodium ibandronate.

Summary of Background Data. Spinal giant cell tumors are a rare clinical entity with a high recurrence rate after operation. Furthermore, complete resection of such lesions remains a challenging surgical problem. Up to this point, no effective adjuvant therapy has been reported for primary or recurrent spinal giant cell tumors.

Methods. One patient with a recurrent giant cell tumor of the seventh thoracic vertebra, one patient with a fifth lumbar vertebral giant cell tumor, and one patient with recurrent giant cell tumor of the sacrum were treated with sodium ibandronate either postoperatively or upon recurrence of the tumor.

Results. The first patient with recurrent thoracic giant cell tumor recovered both clinically and radiologically after treatment with sodium ibandronate without reoperation at 6-years follow-up. The second patient also recovered with no recurrence of the tumor at 4-years follow-up. In the third case, although not fully recovered, the recurrent sacral tumor was under control after treatment with sodium ibandronate at 2-years follow-up.

Conclusion. These case studies demonstrate the potential promise of using sodium ibandronate in the treatment of primary and recurrent giant cell tumors of the spine. Furthermore, clinical evaluation should be performed in future studies.

Spinal giant cell tumors are a rare clinical entity with a high recurrence rate after operation. Initial experience of sodium ibandronate treatment revealed potential promise for the treatment of both primary and recurrent giant cell tumors in the spine.

* Spine Surgery Department, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China

Indiana University School of Medicine

Address correspondence and reprint request to Biao Zhang, Department of Spine, the Third Hosipital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China; E-mail: zhangbiaospine@yahoo.com.cn

Acknowledgment date: April 26, 2010. Revision date: September 12, 2010. Acceptance date: October 16, 2010.

The device(s)/drug(s) is/are FDA-approved or approved by corresponding national agency for this indication.

No funds were received in support of this work. No benefits in any form have been or will be received from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this manuscript.

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.