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Coccydynia due to a Benign Notochordal Cell Tumor

Haasper, Carl, MD*; Länger, Florian, MD; Rosenthal, Herbert, MD; Knobloch, Karsten, MD*; Mössinger, Eckart, MD*; Krettek, Christian, MD, FRACS, FRCS*; Bastian, Leonhard, MD*

doi: 10.1097/BRS.0b013e318067e33a
Case Report

Study Design. Case report.

Objective. To present a rare case of a notochordal cell tumor.

Summary of Background Data. We report on a 27-year-old female patient with pain at the lower back and muscle cramps in the area of the right hip. Image studies demonstrated a cystic lesion of the coccyx.

Methods. As clinical symptoms became chronic and were resistant to conservative treatment, a resection of the coccyx was performed.

Results. Histology revealed an intraosseous benign notochordal cell tumor. This tumor represents a recently described notochordal cell proliferation biologically distinct from chordomas.

Conclusions. Overdiagnosis of these notochordal cell proliferations as chordomas may occur if clinicians and pathologists are unfamiliar with the spectrum of notochordal proliferations.

We report on a 27-year-old female patient with a notochordal cell tumor. Image studies demonstrated a cystic lesion of the coccyx. A resection of the coccyx was performed. Histology revealed an intraosseous benign notochordal cell tumor. This tumor represents a notochordal cell proliferation biologically distinct from chordomas.

From the *Trauma Department, †Diagnostic Radiology Department, and ‡Department of Pathology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover Germany. Drs. Haasper and Länger contributed equally to this work.

Acknowledgment date: November 27, 2006. First revision date: February 19, 2007. Acceptance date: February 23, 2007.

The manuscript submitted does not contain information about medical device(s)/drug(s).

No funds were received in support of this work. No benefits in any form have been or will be received from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this manuscript.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Carl Haasper, MD, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, D-30625 Hannover, Germany; E-mail: Haasper.carl@mh-hannover.de

© 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.