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A Rare Case of Cavernous Lymphangioma in the Epidural Space of the Cervicothoracic Spine

Chu, Ming, MD, PhD*; Li, Guozhong, MD*; Wei, Lanlan, MD, PhD*; Lin, Youzhi, MD, PhD*; Qi, Jiping, MD, PhD; Wang, Chao, MD, PhD*; Zhao, Shiguang, MD, PhD*

doi: 10.1097/01.brs.0000250992.55556.fe
Case Report
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Study Design. A case report.

Objectives. To report and discuss a case of lymphangioma in the epidural space of the cervicothoracic spine.

Summary of Background Data. Lymphangioma of the soft tissue is not uncommon, but lymphangiomas presenting as a spinal soft tissue tumor in the epidural space are extremely rare.

Methods. A 61-year-old woman with pain and numbness in the left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a half ring-shaped soft tissue mass in the left epidural space from the C6 to T1 level. The patient underwent osteoplastic laminectomy from C6 to T1. Histopathologic diagnosis of the resected tumor was cavernous lymphangioma.

Results. One year after the operation, the patient reported mild pain in left upper limb, but there was no evidence of local recurrence on magnetic resonance imaging.

Conclusion. To the authors’ knowledge, this is an extremely rare reported case of lymphangioma presenting as a spinal soft tissue tumor in the cervicothoracic epidural space. Further observation is recommended because of the possibility of local recurrence.

Lymphangioma of the soft tissue is not uncommon, but lymphangiomas presenting as a spinal soft tissue tumor in the epidural space are extremely rare. We report and discuss a case of lymphangioma in the epidural space of the cervicothoracic spine.

From the Departments of *Neurosurgery and †Pathology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China.

Acknowledgment date: May 1, 2006. First revision date: July 16, 2006. Second revision date: August 25, 2006. Acceptance date: August 25, 2006.

The manuscript submitted does not contain information about medical device(s)/drug(s).

Foundation funds were received in support of this work. No benefits in any form have been or will be received from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this manuscript.

Supported by Research Fund of Natural Sciences of Heilongjiang Province of China (No. QC05C32), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 30600204), and Research Fund of Chinapostdoctor (No. 2005038212).

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Ming Chu, MD, PhD, Department of Neurosurgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 23#Youzheng Street, Nangang Region, Harbin,150001, China; E-mail: penguin120@163.com

© 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.