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A Prospective Assessment of SRS-24 Scores After Endoscopic Anterior Instrumentation for Scoliosis

Crawford, John R., FRCS; Izatt, Maree T., BPhty; Adam, Clayton J., PhD; Labrom, Robert D., FRACS; Askin, Geoffrey N., FRACS

doi: 10.1097/01.brs.0000239219.45703.d4
Health Services Research

Study Design. Prospective clinical case series.

Objective. To evaluate the clinical outcome of anterior endoscopic instrumention for scoliosis using the SRS-24 questionnaire and to examine how these scores change over a 2-year follow-up period.

Summary of Background Data. Anterior endoscopic instrumentation correction has several advantages compared with open procedures. However, the clinical results of this technique using a validated outcome measure have rarely been reported in the literature.

Methods. A total of 83 consecutive patients underwent endoscopic anterior instrumentation performed at a single unit. Patients completed the SRS-24 questionnaire before surgery and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. The SRS-24 scores were compared between each of the follow-up intervals.

Results. The pain, general self-image, and function from back condition domains improved after surgery (P < 0.05). Activity level significantly improved between 3 and 6 months, and both function domains improved between 6 and 12 months (P < 0.05). None of the domains increased significantly after 1 year.

Conclusions. Endoscopic anterior instrumentation for scoliosis significantly improved pain, self-image, and function. The greatest improvement in function occurred between 6 and 12 months after surgery. The SRS-24 scores at 1 year from surgery may provide a good indicator of patient outcome in the long-term.

A total of 83 patients underwent endoscopic anterior instrumentation. Patients completed SRS-24 questionnaires at regular intervals until 2 years after surgery. The pain, general self-image, and function from back condition domains improved after surgery. Greatest improvement in function occurred between 6 and 12 months, and none of the domains increased significantly after 1 year.

From the Paediatric Spine Research Group, Mater Children's Hospital, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Acknowledgment date: February 3, 2006. First revision date: April 6, 2006. Acceptance date: May 8, 2006.

The manuscript submitted does not contain information about medical device(s)/drug(s).

No funds were received in support of this work. No benefits in any form have been or will be received from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this manuscript.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to John R. Crawford, FRCS, Paediatric Spine Research Group, Level 2, Mater Children's Hospital, Raymond Terrace, South Brisbane, Queensland 4101, Australia; E-mail: jrcrawford@doctors.org.uk

© 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.