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TATE ROBERT L. III; TERRY, RICHARD E.
Soil Science: April 1982
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ABSTRACTWe examined nitrite production in Pahokee muck, a drained Histosol, collected in the Everglades agricultural area. Soil nitrite levels ranged from 0 to 21.8 and 0 to 5.10 micrograms of nitrite-nitrogen per cubic centimeter in surface (0 to 10 cm) soils in 1977–78 and 1980, respectively. In 1980, 83 percent (n = 125) of the samples contained less than 0.5 μg nitrite-N/cm3, with 33 percent containing no detectable nitrite. No effect of crop on mean nitrite levels was detected. Nitrite concentrations generally correlated with nitrate and, in some cases, soil moisture, but not ammonium. In laboratory studies, maximum nitrite accumulated in muck samples amended with nitrate plus glucose and incubated anaerobically. No nitrite was detected in unamended samples incubated aerobically. These data suggest denitrification as the source of nitrite in Pahokee muck.

We examined nitrite production in Pahokee muck, a drained Histosol, collected in the Everglades agricultural area. Soil nitrite levels ranged from 0 to 21.8 and 0 to 5.10 micrograms of nitrite-nitrogen per cubic centimeter in surface (0 to 10 cm) soils in 1977–78 and 1980, respectively. In 1980, 83 percent (n = 125) of the samples contained less than 0.5 μg nitrite-N/cm3, with 33 percent containing no detectable nitrite. No effect of crop on mean nitrite levels was detected. Nitrite concentrations generally correlated with nitrate and, in some cases, soil moisture, but not ammonium. In laboratory studies, maximum nitrite accumulated in muck samples amended with nitrate plus glucose and incubated anaerobically. No nitrite was detected in unamended samples incubated aerobically. These data suggest denitrification as the source of nitrite in Pahokee muck.

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