Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

HIRA G. S.; BAJWA, M. S.; SINGH, N. T.
Soil Science: June 1981
Article: PDF Only
Buy

ABSTRACTEstimating the water required for the dissolution of gypsum in sodic soils and for reducing the level of salinity in gypsiferous, saline soils is an important step during the reclamation of such soils. We have developed a mathematical equation for predicting gypsum dissolution in sodic soil, using the equal-reduction hypothesis, which postulates that the rate of particle diameter reduction during dissolution is unaffected by particle size. The necessary assumptions underlying this hypothesis have been stated. We have examined the resulting equation for its experimental validity by using gypsum of different particle sizes and soils varying in exchangeable sodium. Comparing the experimentally observed and predicted values showed that the equation could be used to estimate the water needed for the dissolution of gypsum in sodic soils.

Estimating the water required for the dissolution of gypsum in sodic soils and for reducing the level of salinity in gypsiferous, saline soils is an important step during the reclamation of such soils. We have developed a mathematical equation for predicting gypsum dissolution in sodic soil, using the equal-reduction hypothesis, which postulates that the rate of particle diameter reduction during dissolution is unaffected by particle size. The necessary assumptions underlying this hypothesis have been stated. We have examined the resulting equation for its experimental validity by using gypsum of different particle sizes and soils varying in exchangeable sodium. Comparing the experimentally observed and predicted values showed that the equation could be used to estimate the water needed for the dissolution of gypsum in sodic soils.

© Williams & Wilkins 1981. All Rights Reserved.