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MIYAMOTO S.; BOHN, H. L.; RYAN, J.; YEE, M. S.
Soil Science: November 1974
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The water-stable soil aggregates were measured for two noncalcareous, two sodic-cal-careous, and six calcareous soils as affected by H2SO4 and SO2 treatment. The aggregate stability, the percentage of silt and clay remaining as an > 50 μ aggregate, decreased with increasing amounts of H2SO4 and SO2 When H2SO4 was applied at 1.3 times the acidtitratable basicity of the soils, the aggregate stability decreased on the average from 62 to 17 percent in the caleareous soils and from 45 to 32 percent in the noncalcareous soils. The relative aggregate stability, the ratio of the destroyed portion of the aggregate to its total, decreased similarly with relative acidification for all the calcareous soils. Drying at 105°C for 24 hr after the H2SO4 further destroyed approximately 10 percent more aggregate at 20 percent neutralization of the basicity. The sorption of SO2 from moist streams also reduced the aggregate stability but the reduction was less than equivalent amounts of H2SO4 solutions.

© Williams & Wilkins 1974. All Rights Reserved.