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BARNHISEL R I; ROTROMEL, ARMINE L.
Soil Science: July 1974
Original Article: PDF Only
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ABSTRACTKaolinite and mica clay minerals were subjected to simulated sulfuric acid coal strip-mine solutions for periods up to six months. These data indicate that the mode of attack of the acid on both clays was at the edges. The acid released Al, Fe, K, Si, and possibly other ions to the solution phase, thereby serving as one possible explanation for the large amounts of Al3+ found in coal spoil solutions. It appears in the case of mica that the dissolution of the edges (octahedral layer) precedes the removal of K+ from the interlayer positions. The rate of dissolution of kaolinite and mica were similar and one would not expect large changes in mineralogies of natural spoil-bank materials from acid dissolution when these spoil materials are dominated by these two minerals.

Kaolinite and mica clay minerals were subjected to simulated sulfuric acid coal strip-mine solutions for periods up to six months. These data indicate that the mode of attack of the acid on both clays was at the edges. The acid released Al, Fe, K, Si, and possibly other ions to the solution phase, thereby serving as one possible explanation for the large amounts of Al3+ found in coal spoil solutions. It appears in the case of mica that the dissolution of the edges (octahedral layer) precedes the removal of K+ from the interlayer positions. The rate of dissolution of kaolinite and mica were similar and one would not expect large changes in mineralogies of natural spoil-bank materials from acid dissolution when these spoil materials are dominated by these two minerals.

© Williams & Wilkins 1974. All Rights Reserved.