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HANKIN LESTER; SANDS, DAVID C.; HILL, DAVID E.
Soil Science: July 1974
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ABSTRACTAn examination was made of bacterial populations in a number of Connecticut soils and their ability to produce certain degradative enzymes. The soils examined were obtained from cultivated land, pasture, orchard, forest, forest litter, tidal march, and swamp. The biochemical activities of the bacteria generally occurred in the following order of increasing frequency: cellulolytic < pectolytic < amylolytic < lipolytic < proteolytic. The proportion of bacteria able to degrade protein and starch appears to be related to the present use of the soil. The percentage of bacteria in a given soil able to degrade cellulose or pectin was not greatly influenced by the present soil use. The proportion of lipolytic bacteria in soils was exceedingly variable. These results are discussed in relation to source and type of substrate available to the soil bacteria.

An examination was made of bacterial populations in a number of Connecticut soils and their ability to produce certain degradative enzymes. The soils examined were obtained from cultivated land, pasture, orchard, forest, forest litter, tidal march, and swamp. The biochemical activities of the bacteria generally occurred in the following order of increasing frequency: cellulolytic < pectolytic < amylolytic < lipolytic < proteolytic. The proportion of bacteria able to degrade protein and starch appears to be related to the present use of the soil. The percentage of bacteria in a given soil able to degrade cellulose or pectin was not greatly influenced by the present soil use. The proportion of lipolytic bacteria in soils was exceedingly variable. These results are discussed in relation to source and type of substrate available to the soil bacteria.

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