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BETTER PROGNOSIS FOR EYES WITH PRESERVED FOVEAL DEPRESSION AFTER INTRAVITREAL RANIBIZUMAB INJECTION FOR MACULAR EDEMA SECONDARY TO CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION

Kitagawa, Shuta, MD; Yasuda, Shunsuke, MD, PhD; Ito, Yasuki, MD, PhD; Ueno, Shinji, MD, PhD; Iwase, Takeshi, MD, PhD; Terasaki, Hiroko, MD, PhD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000001707
Original Study

Purpose: To determine the prognosis of eyes with central retinal vein occlusion that had a preserved foveal depression at the baseline and were treated by intravitreal ranibizumab injections (IRIs).

Methods: The authors reviewed the medical records of 23 eyes of 23 consecutive treatment-naive patients who received IRIs to treat the macular edema due to central retinal vein occlusion. Eyes were classified by the pre-IRI presence or absence of a foveal depression. A foveal depression was defined as a central foveal thickness that was <50 μm thinner than the average thickness at 200 μm temporal and nasal to the central fovea. The characteristics of the two groups were compared.

Results: Seven of 23 eyes had a preserved foveal depression before the IRI. The mean number of injections within 12 months after the initial IRI was significantly fewer (P < 0.001) in eyes with foveal depression (1.6 ± 0.5) than in eyes without foveal depression (4.3 ± 1.3). The mean best-corrected visual acuity at 12 months after the initial IRI was significantly better (P = 0.003) in eyes with foveal depression (0.10 ± 0.17 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR] units; 20/25 Snellen units) than in eyes without foveal depression (0.77 ± 0.54 logMAR units; 20/118 Snellen units).

Conclusion: These results indicate that the prognosis is better for eyes with a foveal depression before the IRI treatment for a macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion.

This study analyzed the prognosis of eyes with central retinal vein occlusion and preserved foveal depression at baseline that were treated by ranibizumab injection. The authors’ results add further evidence that cases with thinner baseline central retinal thickness accompanied by a foveal depression might have a good prognosis with fewer injections.

Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

Reprint requests: Shunsuke Yasuda, MD, PhD, Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsuruma-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550, Japan; e-mail: s.yasuda@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

Supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant numbers 26861444, and 26462635.

None of the authors has any conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.