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WIDEFIELD SPECTRAL-DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF PERIPHERAL ROUND RETINAL HOLES WITH OR WITHOUT RETINAL DETACHMENT

Casswell, Edward J., FRCOphth; Abou Ltaif, Sleiman, MRCOphth; Carr, Thomas, BSc (Hons); Keane, Pearse A., FRCOphth; Charteris, David G., FRCOphth; Wickham, Louisa, FRCOphth

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000002133
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: To describe the widefield spectral-domain optical coherence tomography features of peripheral round retinal holes, with or without associated retinal detachment (RD).

Methods: Retrospective, observational study of 28 eyes with peripheral round retinal holes, with and without RD. Patients underwent imaging with a widefield 50-degree spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (Heidelberg Engineering, Germany) and Optos ultra-widefield imaging systems (Optos, United Kingdom).

Results: Vitreous attachment at the site of the retinal hole was detected in 27/28 (96.4%) cases. Cases were split into three groups: RHs with RD (n = 12); RHs with subretinal fluid (n = 5), and flat RHs (n = 11), with minimal or no subretinal fluid. 91.6% retinal holes associated with subretinal fluid or RD had vitreous attachment at the site of the hole. Eighty percent had vitreous attachment at both edges of the retinal hole, in a U-shape configuration, which appeared to exert traction. By contrast, flat retinal holes had visible vitreous attachment only at one edge of the retinal hole in 45.4%.

Conclusion: Vitreous attachment was commonly seen at the site of round retinal holes. Vitreous attachment at both edges of the retinal hole in a U-shape configuration was more commonly seen at holes associated with subretinal fluid or RD.

Peripheral round holes, both with and without retinal detachment, were often associated with vitreous attachment on optical coherence tomography imaging. A U-shape configuration was more commonly seen when associated with retinal detachment or subretinal fluid.

Vitreo-Retinal Department, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

Reprint requests: Edward J. Casswell, FRCOphth, Moorfields Eye Hospital, 162 City Road, London EC2A 4PD; e-mail: edward.casswell@nhs.net

E.J.C. is supported by the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh (RCSEd). P.A.K. is supported by a Clinician Scientist award (CS-2014–14-023) from the National Institute for Health Research. D.G.C. and L.W. are supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre based at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology.

None of the authors has any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

These funding organizations had no role in the design or conduct of this research. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the RCSEd, NHS, NIHR, or Department of Health.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.