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TIME COURSE OF CHANGES IN OPTIC DISK NEOVASCULARIZATION AFTER A SINGLE INTRAVITREAL BEVACIZUMAB INJECTION

Falavarjani, Khalil, Ghasemi, MD*; Habibi, Abbas, MD*; Khorasani, Maryam, Ashraf, MD*; Anvari, Pasha, MD*; Sadda, Srinivas, R., MD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000002107
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: To evaluate the longitudinal changes in optic disk neovascularization (NVD) after intravitreal bevacizumab injection using optical coherence tomography angiography.

Methods: In this prospective, interventional, case series, eyes with NVD secondary to diabetic retinopathy were enrolled. En face optical coherence tomography angiographic images were obtained from the optic disks before and 3 hours, 6 hours, 24 hours, 7 days, and 30 days after intravitreal bevacizumab injection. The size and flow area of the neovascularization were measured by two graders.

Results: Eleven eyes of 9 patients with a mean age of 52.11 ± 9.48 years were included. The reduction in the NVD size and flow area was statistically significant at 24 hours, 7 days, and 30 days after injections compared with the baseline measurements (all P < 0.05). The decremental regression in the NVD size and flow area continued during the study course. The changes were not statistically significant in 3-hour and 6-hour measurements (all P > 0.05).

Conclusion: In this study, statistically significant regression in the NVD size and flow area was observed as early as 24 hours after a single intravitreal bevacizumab injection, with a continued decreasing trend for at least a 1-month period.

Regression in the size and flow area of the disk neovascularization was detected as early as 24 hours after a single intravitreal bevacizumab injection using optical coherence tomography angiography, with a continued decreasing trend for at least a 1-month period.

*Eye Research Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Rassoul Akram Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; and

Department of Ophthalmology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California-Los Angeles, California, and Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California.

Reprint requests: Khalil Ghasemi Falavarjani, MD, Eye Research Center, Rassoul Akram Hospital, Sattarkhan-Niaiesh Street, Tehran,1445613131 Iran; e-mail: drghasemi@yahoo.com

S. Sadda is a consultant for Optos, Alergan, Genentech, Novartis, Thrombogenics, Iconic, CenterVue, and NightstaRx and receives financial support from Optos, Alergan, Genentech, and Carl Zeiss Meditec. The remaining authors have no financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.