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THE ROLE OF INTRAOCULAR GAS TAMPONADE IN RHEGMATOGENOUS RETINAL DETACHMENT: A Synthesis of the Literature

Neffendorf, James, E., FRCOphth*; Gupta, Bhaskar, FRCOphth; Williamson, Tom, H., FRCOphth

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000002015
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: To review the literature regarding intraocular gas tamponade after vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

Methods: The history and evolution of the use of gas is described. The theories explaining gas tamponade are discussed, and efficacy and safety studies in human and animal models are covered.

Results: A total of 61 articles relating to gas tamponade were cited in this review.

Conclusion: Gas tamponade is a frequently used procedure in vitreoretinal surgery. An understanding of its mechanism of action is crucial for its safe use when determining which gas is to be used and at what concentration.

This article discusses the theory and evidence behind gas tamponade after vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

*Prince Charles Eye Unit, King Edward VII Hospital, Windsor, United Kingdom;

Southampton Eye Unit, University Hospital Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom; and

Department of Ophthalmology, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

Reprint requests: Tom H. Williamson, FRCOphth, St. Thomas' Hospital, Lambeth Palace Road, London SE1 7EH, United Kingdom; e-mail: tom@retinasurgery.co.uk

The paper was presented at Duke Advanced Vitreous Surgery (AVS) Course, at Duke Eye Centre, April 21-22, 2017.

None of the authors has any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.