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SIGNIFICANT REDUCTION OF BOTH PERIPAPILLARY AND SUBFOVEAL CHOROIDAL THICKNESS AFTER PANRETINAL PHOTOCOAGULATION IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

Kang, Hae Min, MD*,†; Lee, Na Eun, MD; Choi, Jeong Hoon, MD§; Koh, Hyoung Jun, MD, PhD; Lee, Sung Chul, MD, PhD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000001804
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: To evaluate changes in peripapillary choroidal thickness (PCT) and subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) after panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) for diabetic retinopathy.

Methods: This retrospective interventional study included 59 treatment-naive eyes of 33 patients who underwent PRP and completed ≥12 months of follow-up. Peripapillary choroidal thickness and SFCT were measured at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post-PRP. Differences between baseline and 12 months (ΔSFCT and ΔPCT) and percentage changes (ΔSFCT or ΔPCT/baseline × 100%) were determined.

Results: Mean SFCT was 287.7 ± 76.7 μm (139.0–469.0 μm) at baseline and 225.8 ± 62.0 μm (102.5–379.5 μm) 12 months post-PRP (P < 0.001). Mean PCT was 161.2 ± 16.5 μm (75.3–308.1 μm) at baseline and 128.4 ± 41.8 μm (73.0–212.9 μm) 12 months post-PRP (P < 0.001). ΔSFCT was −61.3 ± 28.7 μm (−139.5 to −17.0 μm), and %SFCT was 21.2 ± 7.2% (6.8% to 36.1%). ΔPCT was −36.4 ± 23.2 μm (−149.1 to 5.4 μm), and %PCT was 22.4 ± 12.0% (2.5% to 62.6%). Diabetic retinopathy severity was the only factor significantly correlated with %SFCT (β = 0.500, P = 0.004) and %PCT (β = 0.152, P = 0.024).

Conclusion: Both PCT and SFCT reduced significantly after PRP. Diabetic retinopathy severity was significantly correlated with post-PRP changes of peripapillary and SFCT.

In this study, both subfoveal and peripapillary choroidal thickness reduced significantly over the 12 months after panretinal photocoagulation for diabetic retinopathy. The severity of diabetic retinopathy was significantly correlated with the changes in choroidal thickness.

*Department of Ophthalmology, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, International St. Mary's Hospital, Incheon, Republic of Korea;

Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Vision Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea;

Department of Ophthalmology, Hallym Hospital, Incheon, Republic of Korea; and

§Bundang Seoul Eye Clinic.

Reprint requests: Hae Min Kang, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, International St. Mary's Hospital, 100 Simgok-ro, Seo-gu, Inchoen 120-752, Republic of Korea; e-mail: liebe05@naver.com

Supported by research fund of Catholic Kwandong University, International St. Mary's Hospital (CKURF-201604720001).

None of the authors has any conflicting interests to disclose.

H. M. Kang, N. E. Lee, and J. H. Choi designed and conducted the study. H. M. Kang collected the data. H. M. Kang, J. H. Choi, N. E. Lee, H. J. Koh, and S. C. Lee managed, analyzed, and interpreted the data. H. M. Kang, J. H. Choi, N. E. Lee, H. J. Koh, and S. C. Lee prepared, reviewed, and approved the manuscript.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.