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PREVALENCE AND CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PACHYDRUSEN IN POLYPOIDAL CHOROIDAL VASCULOPATHY: Multimodal Image Study

Lee, Junwon, MD, PhD; Byeon, Suk Ho, MD, PhD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000002019
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of a newly defined drusen type, pachydrusen, soft drusen, and subretinal drusenoid deposits in eyes with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy and fellow eyes and the relationship between each drusen type and the choroidal thickness, vascular morphology, and hyperpermeability.

Methods: The 169 eyes of 90 patients with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy were retrospectively reviewed. The prevalence of each drusen type was evaluated using color fundus photography and optical coherence tomography. The choroidal thickness and presence of pachyvessels on optical coherence tomography and choroidal vascular hyperpermeability on indocyanine green angiography were compared among the drusen groups.

Results: Pachydrusen, soft drusen, and subretinal drusenoid deposits were found in 49.3%, 12.3%, and 6.9% in polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy eyes. The mean subfoveal choroidal thickness of the pachydrusen, soft drusen, and subretinal drusenoid deposit groups was 403.1, 184.4, and 176.4 µm. The pachydrusen group showed significantly thicker choroid than the others. The choroidal hyperpermeability was noticed at 41.7%, 0%, and 0% and the pachyvessel was observed at 80.6%, 44.4%, and 40% in pachydrusen, soft drusen, and subretinal drusenoid deposit groups, respectively.

Conclusion: In patients with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy, pachydrusen was prevalent and associated with thicker choroid. Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy with pachydrusen was highly associated with choroidal vascular hyperpremeability and pachyvessel morphology than other types of drusen.

A newly defined drusen type pachydrusen was prevalent and associated with a thick choroid in eyes with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy with pachydrusen was also highly associated with choroidal vascular hyperpermeability and pachyvessel morphology than other types of drusen, such as soft drusen and subretinal drusenoid deposits.

Department of Ophthalmology, Eye and ENT Hospital, Severance Hospital, Institute of Vision Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.

Reprint requests: Suk Ho Byeon, MD, PhD, Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Vision Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul, South Korea, 03722; e-mail: shbyeon@yuhs.ac.kr

Supported by grants from the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (Grant number: 2017R1A2B4011045) and the Korea Health Technology R&D Project through the Korea Health Industry Development Institute (KHIDI) funded by the Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (Grant number: HI17C1234).

None of the authors has any conflicting interests to disclose.

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© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.