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PREDICTIVE FACTORS OF SURGICAL OUTCOMES IN VITRECTOMY FOR MYOPIC TRACTION MACULOPATHY

Hattori, Kyoko, MD; Kataoka, Keiko, MD, PhD*; Takeuchi, Jun, MD; Ito, Yasuki, MD, PhD; Terasaki, Hiroko, MD, PhD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000001927
Duke 2017: PDF Only

Purpose: To assess predictive factors and surgical outcomes for myopic traction maculopathy.

Methods: This retrospective observational case study enrolled 73 patients who underwent vitrectomy for myopic traction maculopathy. The 79 eyes obtained from our study sample were divided into 4 types: retinoschisis, lamellar macular hole (lamellar MH), foveal retinal detachment (FRD), and FRD + lamellar MH, or into 2 types according to the presence of FRD preoperatively. Dependent variables of interest were age, sex, pre- and postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at 6 months, and axial length.

Results: All the four types showed moderately strong-to-strong positive correlations with pre- and postoperative BCVA (retinochisisi: r = 0.61; lamellar MH: r = 0.62; FRD: r = 0.51; FRD + lamellar MH; r = 0.83). Preoperative BCVA was associated with postoperative BCVA (P < 0.0001), but age, axial length, and the types of preoperative foveal status were not. Eyes with FRD had significantly worse pre- and postoperative BCVA than eyes without FRD (P = 0.036 and P = 0.046, respectively). Postoperative full-thickness macular holes developed in 5.1% of cases and in all types but retinoschisis.

Conclusion: Preoperative visual acuity and the presence of FRD should be considered for surgical indication of myopic traction maculopathy.

This large retrospective case series examines the relationships between preoperative optical coherence tomography findings and surgical outcomes for myopic traction maculopathy. Preoperative foveal retinal detachment indicated worse pre- and postoperative visual acuity. Postoperative full-thickness macular holes developed in 5.1% of cases by 1 month.

Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

Reprint requests: Keiko Kataoka, MD, PhD, Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550, Japan; e-mail: kkeiko@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

Supported in part by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS, Tokyo, Japan) KAKENHI Grant (JP16K11265, Y.I.; JP15H40994, H.T.).

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.