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OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY FEATURES OF ANGIOID STREAKS

Corbelli, Eleonora, MD*; Carnevali, Adriano, MD*,†; Marchese, Alessandro, MD*; Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria, MD*; Querques, Lea, MD*; Sacconi, Riccardo, MD*,‡; Bandello, Francesco, MD, FEBO*; Querques, Giuseppe, MD, PhD*

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000001859
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: To analyze the optical coherence tomography angiography features of eyes affected with angioid streaks (AS) and to evaluate their ability to predict choroidal neovascularization (CNV) activity.

Methods: Angioid streaks were individuated from a pool of consecutive patients. Eyes with and without CNV were evaluated by multimodal imaging.

Results: Thirty-eight eyes of 19 consecutive patients diagnosed with AS were included. Thirty of 38 eyes with CNV and 8 of 38 eyes without CNV were included. In the majority of cases, CNV showed on optical coherence tomography angiography tangled appearance always associated with signs of neovascular inactivity on multimodal imaging (100%–0%, inactive-active, respectively). Choroidal neovascularization cases showing interlacing appearance were often associated with signs of neovascular activity on multimodal imaging (71.4%–28.6%, active-inactive, respectively). Optical coherence tomography angiography revealed a total of 27 AS, of which 20 appeared as a choriocapillary rarefaction, and in 7 AS, optical coherence tomography angiography choriocapillary segmentation revealed an irregular vascular network, possibly representing fibrovascular tissue over the crack-like breaks in Bruch membrane.

Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography angiography is a noninvasive tool to detect the presence of CNV secondary to AS and to evaluate CNV activity. Optical coherence tomography angiography is able to add a novel element to the multimodal imaging characterization of AS.

The aim of this study was to analyze retrospectively optical coherence tomography angiography features of eyes affected by angioid streaks with and without choroidal neovascularization and to propose a new classification criterion.

*Department of Ophthalmology, University Vita-Salute, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy;

Department of Ophthalmology, University of “Magna Graecia,” Catanzaro, Italy; and

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.

Reprint requests: Giuseppe Querques, MD, PhD, Department of Ophthalmology, University Vita-Salute, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy; e-mail: giuseppe.querques@hotmail.it

None of the authors has any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.