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MECHANISM OF “FLAP CLOSURE” AFTER THE INVERTED INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE FLAP TECHNIQUE

Bonińska, Karolina, MD*; Nawrocki, Jerzy, MD, PhD*,†; Michalewska, Zofia, MD, PhD*,†

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000001861
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: Recent studies described that in approximately 14% to 16% of cases of macular holes treated with the inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique, the hole was closed only by a thin layer of inverted internal limiting membrane—“flap closure.” The aim of this article was to describe the functional and anatomical results in flap closure macular holes and also the mechanism of flap closure.

Methods: A retrospective observational study of 149 eyes of 139 patients treated with vitrectomy using the inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique was reviewed to aggregate eyes with flap closure. Complete ophthalmic examination was performed preoperatively and at 7 days, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery.

Results: Flap closure (Group 1) was noted in 24 eyes and other closure types in 125 eyes (Group 2). The mean minimal and base diameters of the macular holes in the flap closure group were greater than those in Group 2 (P < 0.001). The mean postoperative best-corrected visual acuity in the flap closure group (20/100) was lower than that in Group 2 (20/50) (P < 0.001).

Conclusion: Flap closure probably enables closure of large macular holes with a higher probability of remaining open without the use of the inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique. Foveal architecture continuously improved.

The inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique was confirmed to improve anatomical and functional results in large and high myopic macular holes. This study described that in 16.1% of cases treated with this technique, the hole was closed only by a thin layer of inverted internal limiting membrane flap—“flap closure.” It probably enables closure of large macular holes with a higher probability of remaining open without the use of the inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique.

*Ophthalmic Clinic “Jasne Blonia,” Ophthalmology Department, Lodz, Poland; and

Dr K. Jonscher Municipal Medical Centre, Lodz, Poland.

Reprint requests: Karolina Bonińska, MD, Ophthalmic Clinic, “Jasne Blonia”, 91-134 Lodz, Poland, ul. Rojna 90, e-mail: karolina.boninska@gmail.com

None of the authors has any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.