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INTRAOPERATIVE OCULAR MANOMETRY IN SILICONE OIL–FILLED EYES WITH A BOSTON TYPE 1 KERATOPROSTHESIS

Toygar, Okan, MD*,†; Mestanoglu, Mert; Riemann, Christopher D., MD*,§

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000002269
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: To demonstrate a novel technique to measure the intraocular pressure in silicone oil (SO)-filled eyes with Boston Type 1 keratoprosthesis (KPro) during intraocular surgery.

Methods: In this retrospective case series, an ocular manometer that is predicated on a continuous fluid column between a pressure sensor and interior of the eye was designed and used to directly measure intraocular pressure during intraocular surgery in SO-filled eyes with KPro.

Results: Six eyes of six patients were included in the study. The indications for SO injection with ocular manometry were hypotony in five patients, and endophthalmitis and complex retinal detachment with proliferative vitreoretinopathy in one patient. All patients had a successful reinflation of their globes without any evidence of SO underfill, without evidence of SO overfill, and without progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Visual acuity increased in five eyes and was maintained in one eye.

Conclusion: Intraoperative ocular manometry is a safe and effective technique in determining intraocular pressure in SO-filled eyes with KPro.

Intraoperative ocular manometry is a safe and effective technique in determining the intraocular pressure in silicone oil–filled eyes with Boston Type 1 keratoprosthesis.

*Cincinnati Eye Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio;

Department of Ophthalmology, Bahcesehir University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey;

Bahcesehir University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey; and

§Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati School of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Reprint requests: Christopher D. Riemann, MD, Cincinnati Eye Institute, 1945 CEI Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 45242; e-mail: criemann@cincinnatieye.com

Supported in part by an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness, Inc, New York, NY, to the University of Cincinnati, Department of Ophthalmology.

None of the authors has any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

This study was performed at the Cincinnati Eye Institute and University of Cincinnati, Department of Ophthalmology.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.