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FIVE-YEAR FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER EPIRETINAL MEMBRANE SURGERY: A Prospective, Controlled Study

Jonna, Gowtham, MD*,†; Thompson, Ian A., MD, MPH*; Mendel, Thomas A., MD, PhD*; Kim, Stephen J., MD*

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000002323
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: To evaluate 5-year functional outcomes involving the inner retina after epiretinal membrane (ERM) surgery.

Methods: The study eye (SE) and fellow eye (FE) of 20 patients undergoing ERM surgery were examined preoperatively and at 3, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months postoperatively. Retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell–inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL) thicknesses were analyzed using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Humphrey visual field mean deviation, pattern SD, and qualitative changes were assessed and compared over time.

Results: Mean GC-IPL thickness in SEs was less than that of FEs at all time points with progressive thinning in SEs after ERM surgery. There was significant thinning of the superotemporal GC-IPL in SEs as compared to FEs at 3 months and 60 months (P < 0.05). Humphrey visual field mean deviation was greater in SEs as compared to FEs but statistically significant only at 0, 12, and 24 months (P < 0.05). Pattern SD increased from baseline in SEs but remained near baseline in FEs.

Conclusion: Surgical eyes after ERM surgery demonstrated progressive thinning of the GC-IPL and transient worsening trends in Humphrey visual field mean deviation and pattern SD as compared to controls after ERM surgery.

Surgical eyes demonstrated progressive thinning of the ganglion cell–inner plexiform layer as compared to fellow control eyes after vitrectomy surgery for epiretinal membrane. This difference was statistically significant or approached statistical significance for the superotemporal quadrant at all time points up to 5 years postoperatively.

*Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Vanderbilt Eye Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; and

Retina Consultants of Austin, Austin, Texas.

Reprint requests: Stephen J. Kim, MD, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Vanderbilt Eye Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2311 Pierce Avenue, Nashville, TN 37232; e-mail: skim30@gmail.com

Supported by an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness to the Vanderbilt University Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences.

None of the authors has any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.