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COMPARISON OF SHORT-TERM EFFICACY BETWEEN ORAL SPIRONOLACTONE TREATMENT AND PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF NONRESOLVING CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY

Lee, Ji, Hwan, MD*; Lee, Sung, Chul, MD*; Kim, Hyesun, MD; Lee, Christopher, Seungkyu, MD*

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000001913
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: To compare the short-term therapeutic efficacy of oral spironolactone treatment with that of half-dose photodynamic therapy (PDT) in patients with nonresolving central serous chorioretinopathy.

Methods: This retrospective, interventional, comparative study included 41 patients with nonresolving central serous chorioretinopathy who exhibited subretinal fluid accumulation for more than 3 months. Of the 41 patients, 18 (18 eyes) received oral spironolactone treatment and 23 (23 eyes) received half-dose PDT. Treatment outcomes, including the central macular thickness, subretinal fluid height, subfoveal choroidal thickness, and best-corrected visual acuity, were measured at baseline and 1 and 3 months after treatment.

Results: There were no differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. The central macular thickness and the subretinal fluid height significantly decreased at 1 and 3 months after treatment. The central macular thickness at 1 month was lesser in the PDT group than in the spironolactone group. The subfoveal choroidal thickness decreased at 1 and 3 months only in the PDT group, whereas best-corrected visual acuity showed a significant improvement at 3 months in both groups.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that the short-term efficacy of oral spironolactone treatment for the management of nonresolving central serous chorioretinopathy is comparable with that of half-dose PDT, with an excellent safety profile.

The short-term efficacy of oral spironolactone treatment for the management of nonresolving central serous chorioretinopathy is comparable with that of half-dose photodynamic therapy, with an excellent safety profile.

*Department of Ophthalmology, The Institute of Vision Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; and

Siloam Eye Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Reprint requests: Christopher Seungkyu Lee, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei-ro 50-1, Seodaemu-gu, Seoul 120-752, Korea; e-mail: sklee219@yuhs.ac

Supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1A02937349).

None of the authors has any conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.