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BILATERAL ACUTE RETINAL NECROSIS: A Case Series

Lei, Boya, MD*; Jiang, Rui, MD*; Wang, Zhujian, MD*; Xu, Gezhi, MD, PHD*,†,‡; Wu, Xuyin, NB*; Zhou, Min, MD, PHD*,†,‡

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000002341
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: To investigate the clinical characteristics and visual outcome of bilateral acute retinal necrosis.

Methods: The study included 30 patients (60 eyes) who were diagnosed with bilateral acute retinal necrosis. The medical records were reviewed.

Results: Twenty-five patients developed the disease in the contralateral eye within 5 months and 5 patients at >2 years after the initial onset. At presentation, 14 of 21 eyes suffered from retinal necrosis of more than 180° in the initially affected eye, whereas 3 of 22 eyes suffered it in the later-affected eye. Retinal detachment occurred in 23 of the 27 initially affected eyes and in 5 of the 27 later-affected eyes. The mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution best-corrected visual acuity decreased from 2.0 ± 1.1 (Snellen equivalent counting fingers) to 2.2 ± 1.0 (Snellen equivalent counting fingers) in the initially affected eyes after a follow-up of 34.1 ± 48.2 months (P = 0.529), and improved from 0.5 ± 0.4 (Snellen equivalent 20/66) to 0.3 ± 0.4 (Snellen equivalent 20/40) in the later-affected eyes after a follow-up of 21.2 ± 23.3 months (P = 0.005).

Conclusion: Bilateral acute retinal necrosis usually occurs in the contralateral eye within a few months, but sometimes after several years. Inflammation and retinal necrosis are less severe in the later-affected eye, with less retinal detachment and a better visual outcome.

Bilateral acute retinal necrosis occurs in the contralateral eye within a few months or after several years. Retinal necrosis is less severe in the later-affected eye, with less retinal detachment and a better visual outcome.

*Department of Ophthalmology, Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China;

Shanghai Key Laboratory of Visual Impairment and Restoration, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; and

Key Laboratory of Myopia of State Health Ministry, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

Reprint requests: Min Zhou, MD, PHD, Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, 83 Fen Yang Road, Shanghai 200031, China; e-mail: dr_minzhou@163.com

Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant no. 81570854 and 81770944), Grant from Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (16411953700), and Grant from Shanghai Hospital Development Center (SHDC12016116).

None of the authors has any conflicting interests to disclose.

B. Lei and R. Jiang contributed equally to this work.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.