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ASSOCIATION OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA WITH CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY AND CHOROIDAL THICKNESS: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Wu, Chris, Y., MD*; Riangwiwat, Tanawan, MD; Rattanawong, Pattara, MD†,‡; Nesmith, Brooke L., W., MD, JD*; Deobhakta, Avnish, MD*,§

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000002117
Review: PDF Only

Purpose: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with an array of ocular disorders. This systematic review aims to investigate the association of OSA with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) and subfoveal choroidal thickness changes on enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography.

Methods: Systematic review and meta-analysis of all articles published up to November 2017 examining rate of OSA in patients with CSCR versus controls or examining subfoveal choroidal thickness measurements on enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography in patients with OSA versus controls. Pooled odds ratios and weighted mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated.

Results: For the CSCR/OSA analysis, 7,238 patients (1,479 with CSCR and 5,759 controls) from 6 studies were eligible. For the choroidal thickness/OSA analysis, 778 eyes of 778 patients (514 with OSA and 264 controls) from 9 studies were eligible. Patients with CSCR had a 1.56 increased odds of having OSA than controls (odds ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.16–2.10). There was no statistically significant difference in choroidal thickness between mild OSA subjects and controls (weighted mean difference = −3.17; 95% CI, −19.10 to 12.76). Patients with moderate OSA (weighted mean difference = −24.14; 95% CI, −42.16 to −6.12) and severe OSA (weighted mean difference = −51.19; 95% CI, −99.30 to −3.08) had thinner choroidal thickness measurements than controls.

Conclusion: In summary, our results suggest that patients with CSCR are more likely to have OSA, and that moderate/severe OSA is associated with smaller subfoveal choroidal measurements on enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography.

*Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, New York, New York;

University of Hawaii Internal Medicine Residency Program, Honolulu, Hawaii;

Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; and

§Department of Ophthalmology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.

Reprint requests: Avnish Deobhakta, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, 310 East 14th Street, New York, NY 10003; e-mail: adeobhakta@nyee.edu

None of the authors has any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.