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AIR/FLUID-DROPPING TECHNIQUE FOR INTRACAPSULAR DISTILLED WATER APPLICATION: A Vitrectomy Approach for Selective Targeting of Lens Epithelial Cells

Zhang, Qi, MD; Huang, Liuhui, MD; Jin, Haiying, MD; Li, Jing, MD; Zhao, Peiquan, MD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000001944
Original Study: PDF Only

Purpose: We describe a simplified technique of intracapsular distilled water application for targeting lens epithelial cells using vitrectomy approach of fluid–air exchange and to evaluate the reliability and safety of this technique.

Methods: Consecutive patients with cataract were randomly assigned to treatment group and control group. After the nucleus removal and cortical aspiration, the space of anterior chamber and capsular bag were maintained with continuous infusion of sterile air by using fluid–air exchange technique through side-port incision. Distilled water was dropped into the capsular bag using a specially designed syringe. A concave air–fluid surface (a physical phenomenon) insured the contact of distilled water with the inner surface of the capsule without overflowing from the bag. The distilled water remained in place for 3 minutes and was then removed by the syringe.

Results: No intraoperative surgical complication was observed, and no damage to adjacent intraocular structures was observed during the postoperative follow-up. There was no statistical difference of corneal endothelial cell loss between the treatment group and the control group. Histological study confirmed damage to the lens epithelial cells from anterior capsular specimens treated by the technique.

Conclusion: The simplified technique using vitrectomy approach is safe and specific for targeting lens epithelial cells without associated complications.

We describe a simplified technique for intracapsular distilled water application using a vitrectomy approach of fluid–air exchange technique. Clinical observations revealed that there was no damage to adjacent intraocular structures. Histological study confirmed damage to the lens epithelial cells from anterior capsular specimens treated by the technique.

Department of Ophthalmology, Xinhua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.

Reprint requests: Haiying Jin, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Xinhua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Kongjiang Road, Shanghai 200092, China; e-mail: eagle_jin@163.com and jin_haiying@yahoo.com

Supported in part by the Natural Science Foundation of China (81100655).

None of the authors has any conflicting interests to disclose.

Q. Zhang and L. Huang contributed equally to this research.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.retinajournal.com).

© 2018 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.