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CHOROIDAL THICKNESS OF CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY SECONDARY TO CORTICOSTEROID USE

Honda, Shigeru MD, PhD; Miki, Akiko MD, PhD; Kusuhara, Sentaro MD, PhD; Imai, Hisanori MD, PhD; Nakamura, Makoto MD, PhD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000001380
Original Study

Purpose: Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is a common choroidal disorder which often affects the vision of young adults. Although the molecular mechanisms associated with CSC remain unknown, correlations between steroid hormone use and CSC have been suspected. We investigated the choroidal status of CSC secondary to corticosteroid use.

Methods: The records of 25 eyes of 25 consecutive acute CSC cases secondary to corticosteroid use were reviewed retrospectively. Central choroidal thickness was measured by optical coherent tomography. Choroidal vessel dilation and choroidal vascular hyperpermeability were evaluated based on indocyanine green angiography findings. The parameters related to secondary CSC were compared with those of 25 eyes of 25 cases with acute idiopathic CSC.

Results: The mean central choroidal thickness of secondary CSC was 294.8 ± 95.0 μm, which was significantly thinner than that of idiopathic CSC (409.4 ± 124.7 μm, P = 0.00064). The proportion of the cases exhibiting choroidal vessel dilation was not significantly different between secondary CSC (52%) and idiopathic CSC (64%). The proportion of cases showing choroidal vascular hyperpermeability was significantly smaller in secondary CSC (62%) than idiopathic CSC (92%) (P = 0.028).

Conclusion: The choroidal status in the acute phase of secondary CSC after corticosteroid use might be different from that of idiopathic CSC, which suggests a complex mechanism for CSC.

Choroidal thickness of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) secondary to steroid usage was significantly thinner than that of idiopathic CSC. The cases showing choroidal vascular hyperpermeability was significantly fewer in secondary CSC than idiopathic CSC.

Department of Surgery, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan.

Reprint requests: Shigeru Honda, MD, PhD, Department of Surgery, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017, Japan; e-mail: sighonda@med.kobe-u.ac.jp

Supported by a grant from the Takeda Science Foundation, Osaka, Japan (S.H.). The funding organizations had no role in the design or conduct of this research.

None of the authors has any conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2017 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.