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RETINAL BLOOD FLOW CORRELATES TO AQUEOUS VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR IN CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION

Yamada, Yoshihisa MD, PhD*; Suzuma, Kiyoshi MD, PhD*; Matsumoto, Makiko MD, PhD*; Tsuiki, Eiko MD, PhD*; Fujikawa, Azusa MD, PhD*; Harada, Takafumi MD; Kitaoka, Takashi MD, PhD*

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000000595
Original Study
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Purpose: As laser speckle flowgraphy can measure blood flow distribution in the ocular fundus, the authors analyzed the relationship between retinal blood flow and aqueous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentration in central retinal vein occlusion.

Methods: This prospective observational study examined 45 eyes of 45 patients with central retinal vein occlusion before treatment. Blood flow in large vessels around and at the optic disk, aqueous VEGF concentration, and arteriovenous passage time were examined. Blood flow was evaluated as mean blur rate by laser speckle flowgraphy.

Results: Fluorescein angiography found 20 ischemic and 25 nonischemic type eyes. Aqueous VEGF concentration in the ischemic type was significantly higher than that in the nonischemic type (P = 0.01). Arteriovenous passage time was significantly correlated to the logarithm of the aqueous VEGF concentration (P = 0.0001). Mean blur rate of the affected eye/mean blur rate of the unaffected eye of the ischemic type was significantly lower than the nonischemic type (P = 0.039). Additionally, mean blur rate was significantly correlated both to the logarithm of the aqueous VEGF concentration (P < 0.0001) and to the arteriovenous passage time (P = 0.0001).

Conclusion: Laser speckle flowgraphy may be useful for predicting aqueous VEGF concentration and severity of central retinal vein occlusion.

This study used laser speckle flowgraphy to analyze the relationship between retinal blood flow and aqueous vascular endothelial growth factor concentration in central retinal vein occlusion. A correlation was observed between lower blood flows in large vessels at the optic disk and higher aqueous vascular endothelial growth factor concentrations.

*Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan; and

Yaizukogawa Eye Clinic, Yaizu, Japan.

Reprint requests: Kiyoshi Suzuma, MD, PhD, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8501, Japan; e-mail: suzuma@nagasaki-u.ac.jp

None of the authors have any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2015 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.