Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

INCREASED INCIDENCE OF PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE IN CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY PATIENTS

A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

Chen, San-Ni MD*,†,**; Lian, Iebin PhD; Chen, Yi-Chiao MS; Ho, Jau-Der MD§,¶

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000000278
Original Study
Buy
SDC

Purpose: To investigate peptic ulcer disease and other possible risk factors in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSR) using a population-based database.

Methods: In this population-based retrospective cohort study, longitudinal data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were analyzed. The study cohort comprised 835 patients with CSR and the control cohort comprised 4175 patients without CSR from January 2000 to December 2009. Conditional logistic regression was applied to examine the association of peptic ulcer disease and other possible risk factors for CSR, and stratified Cox regression models were applied to examine whether patients with CSR have an increased chance of peptic ulcer disease and hypertension development.

Results: The identifiable risk factors for CSR included peptic ulcer disease (adjusted odd ratio: 1.39, P = 0.001) and higher monthly income (adjusted odd ratio: 1.30, P = 0.006). Patients with CSR also had a significantly higher chance of developing peptic ulcer disease after the diagnosis of CSR (adjusted odd ratio: 1.43, P = 0.009).

Conclusion: Peptic ulcer disease and higher monthly income are independent risk factors for CSR. Whereas, patients with CSR also had increased risk for peptic ulcer development.

Peptic ulcer is a risk factor for central serous chorioretinopathy. Patients with central serous chorioretinopathy also have higher risk of developing peptic ulcer.

*Department of Ophthalmology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan;

School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan;

Graduate Institute of Statistics and Information Science, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan;

§Department of Ophthalmology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan;

Department of Ophthalmology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; and

**School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Reprint requests: San-Ni Chen, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Changhua Christian Hospital, No. 135, Nan-Hsiao Street, Changhua City, 500 Taiwan; e-mail: 108562@cch.org.tw

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.retinajournal.com).

None of the authors have any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2015 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.