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MACULAR TELANGIECTASIA–CHANGES IN MACULAR PIGMENT OPTICAL DENSITY DURING A 5-YEAR FOLLOW-UP

Zeimer, Meike B. MD; Spital, Georg MD; Heimes, Britta MD; Lommatzsch, Albrecht PhD; Pauleikhoff, Daniel PhD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000000023
Original Study
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Purpose: To quantitatively analyze the distribution of macular pigment (MP) over a period of 5 years and for monitoring progression of macular telangiectasia.

Methods: Macular pigment concentration (autofluorescence, excitation wavelengths: 488 and 514 nm) was determined at baseline and after 5 years in 43 eyes of 22 subjects (46–80 years; mean, 65.6 years; 10 men) participating in the macular telangiectasia project.

Results: Mean MP density at 0.5° declined in the segment (one eighth of a circle) with the highest MP optical density (−0.04 density units; P= 0.015), where density units (DU), and also averaged in the 2 segments that divided segments with detectable MP from those in which MP was no longer detectable (−0.04 density units; P = 0.0005). In the first segment mentioned, 2° values decreased to a lesser extent and not significantly. The diameter of MP loss expanded horizontally from 2.64 mm to 2.74 mm (P = 0.0001) but not vertically. Macular pigment density in the “halo” of peripheral MP at a mean of 5.44° (4.53–6.21°) increased (+0.01 DU; P= 0.01).

Conclusion: Five years of follow-up resulted in central (0.5°) reduction and peripheral (4.53–6.21°) accumulation of MP. Longer period of follow-up may disclose significant changes in paracentral locations. The area of central MP loss expands in particular in a horizontal direction and less vertically. Centrifugal movement of MP during disease may explain our findings.

A significant central (0.5°) reduction and mild but significant peripheral (4.53–6.21°) accumulation of macular pigment was observed in patients with macular telangiectasia in a follow-up period of 5 years. A longer follow-up may disclose significant decreases in paracentral locations. The area of central macular pigment loss expands in particular in a horizontal direction and less vertically. A centrifugal movement of macular pigment during disease may explain our findings.

Institute of Ophthalmology, St. Franziskus Hospital, Münster, Germany.

Reprint requests: Meike B. Zeimer, MD, Institute of Ophthalmology, St. Franziskus Hospital, Hohenzollernring 74, 48145 Münster, Germany; e-mail: Meikezei@web.de

Supported by a grant from the Lowy Medical Research Institute.

None of the authors have any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2014 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.